In the work-from-home battle for space, women are the reluctant nomads

Christel Deskins

<span class="caption">Ward Cleaver of the popular sitcom 'Leave It to Beaver' in his study.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://i.pinimg.com/originals/72/d5/4e/72d54e1687267db51b65becc2caa3dc8.jpg" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Universal Pictures">Universal Pictures</a></span>
Ward Cleaver of the popular sitcom ‘Leave It to Beaver’ in his study. Universal Pictures

It’s just past 10 a.m. and my partner, on his third virtual meeting today, is working non-stop in our home office. My son has taken over the family room to attend a virtual science camp and video-editing classes and to play video games. I now realize that this will be his work space to attend distance learning classes in the fall.

For this reason, each morning, I find myself carrying my laptop and tea around my house trying to find a quiet place to work. Before the pandemic, I never needed a dedicated space at home for work. But now I’m faced with teaching online this fall and won’t have access to my campus office, which closed in March.

With Google announcing that its 200,000 employees can work from home until June 2021 – and

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South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem among influential Women of the Century from Mount Rushmore State

Christel Deskins

It takes a strong person to live in South Dakota.

The harsh winters, the isolation of rural parts of the state, and the uncertainty of relying on Mother Nature to provide a livelihood in agriculture are all reasons some may choose to avoid living in the Mount Rushmore State. 

But for those who live here, there’s beauty in the prairie, in the Black Hills, in the serenity of a cold winter day. There’s also ample opportunity to make an impact on the community, and from the state’s inception, South Dakota women have been making their mark.

In August, America marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, when women gained the legal right to vote. In commemoration of the occasion, the USA TODAY Network is naming 10 American women from all 50 states and the District of Columbia who’ve made significant contributions to their respective states and country as Women

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Women say they will fight sexism, ‘ugly’ attacks on Harris

Christel Deskins

CHICAGO (AP) — In the weeks before Joe Biden named Sen. Kamala Harris his running mate, women’s groups were readying a campaign of their own: shutting down sexist coverage and disinformation about a vice presidential nominee they say is headed for months of false smears and “brutal” attacks from internet haters.

The groups put the media on notice in recent days that they will call out bias — one campaign is dubbed “We Have Her Back” — and established a “war room” to refute sexist or false attacks as they happen.

They didn’t have to wait long. Within minutes of the presumptive Democratic nominee’s announcement Tuesday, false information was circulating on social media, claiming that Harris had called Biden a “racist” and that she is not eligible to be president.

The women’s groups say their efforts are informed by the sexism Hillary Clinton faced from Donald Trump, some of his

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Women say they will fight sexism, ‘ugly’ attacks on Harris

Christel Deskins

CHICAGO (AP) — In the weeks before Joe Biden named Sen. Kamala Harris his running mate, women’s groups were readying a campaign of their own: shutting down sexist coverage and disinformation about a vice presidential nominee they say is headed for months of false smears and “brutal” attacks from internet haters.

The groups put the media on notice in recent days that they will call out bias — one campaign is dubbed “We Have Her Back” — and established a “war room” to refute sexist or false attacks as they happen.

They didn’t have to wait long. Within minutes of the presumptive Democratic nominee’s announcement Tuesday, false information was circulating on social media, claiming that Harris had called Biden a “racist” and that she is not eligible to be president.

The women’s groups say their efforts are informed by the sexism Hillary Clinton faced from Donald Trump, some of his

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Coronavirus child care pinch in U.S. poses threat to economic gains of working women

Christel Deskins

By Jonnelle Marte and Rachel Dissell

CLEVELAND (Reuters) – Most days, Zora Pannell works from her dining room table, sitting in front of her computer, turning off the video on Zoom calls to nurse her one-year-old daughter, Savannah.

Pannell has balanced working from home and caring for her daughter and son Timothy, aged 2, since March when she started a new job as a manager for a language services company the same week that Ohio issued a “stay at home” order to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Working from home is an exhausting daily juggle but she’s more worried about being told it’s time to return to the office. Her husband cannot watch the children during the day because he has a job at a local steel mill and the couple have been unable to find a daycare center they deemed safe and affordable close to their Shaker Heights

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Inside Roy Den Hollander’s War Against Women

Christel Deskins

Photo credit: San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department
Photo credit: San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department

From ELLE

On July 19, a man disguised as a FedEx driver opened fire on the home of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas, killing her husband and 20-year-old son. The FBI has identified men’s rights attorney Roy Den Hollander as “the primary subject in the attack.”

Den Hollander, who was found dead the same day from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, filed numerous “anti-feminist” lawsuits over the years and published thousands of misogynistic blog posts online. He also made derogatory comments about female judges, expressing a “personal grudge against Salas, whom he slandered repeatedly,” according to Buzzfeed News.

Here’s everything you need to know about the case.

Roy Den Hollander was a self-described “anti-feminist” attorney.

The 72-year-old graduated from Columbia University Business School with an MBA in 1997, a school spokesman told NJ.com. He was an associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore in New

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What does it take to be a TikTok star? Three women tell all

Christel Deskins

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

His mouth is distorted into the shape of a letter box and it moves, warped, as he tells his reflection off for not being “cool” enough. It sounds as if he is trapped in a dustbin underwater. It’s 1am and I’ve spent the last three hours jumping from one acid trip to the next. At least that’s what it feels like. It all began with a “quick pre-bedtime social-media scroll” – something I usually have control over. With the other apps, I’m alright at putting them down and getting some sleep. But this is TikTok. And TikTok is different.

I’ve flicked through a chef chopping onions at Road-Runner speed, a couple performing a perfectly coordinated pat-a-cake dance routine (only using their feet instead of clapping hands), and then I was mesmerised by an Ariana-esque woman expertly lip-syncing rap songs while pulling faces that ranged

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How ‘hatewank’ videos became a tool for harassing women in the public eye

Christel Deskins

How 'hatewank' videos became a tool for harassing women in the public eye
How ‘hatewank’ videos became a tool for harassing women in the public eye

In March, one of British journalist Ash Sarkar’s Twitter followers informed her there were “hatewank” videos featuring images of her on a porn website. One of the videos was titled “racist hatewank for Ash Sarkar” and it had been uploaded onto xHamster.

It was during a time when there was a particular uptick in racist online harassment targeting Sarkar, who’s a prominent political journalist and broadcaster in the UK. As a Muslim woman, she is frequently subjected to racist, misogynistic, and highly sexualised abuse. “The racist hatewank was literally a guy masturbating to images of me,” Sarkar told me over the phone. “After I’d read this tweet that it was out there, my partner was the one who looked it up to confirm that it was all there.” Sarkar discovered that photographs of her wearing bikinis had

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One in seven young women receive revenge porn threats, finds Refuge survey

Christel Deskins

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

One in seven young women have received threats that intimate photographs of them will be shared without their consent, according to a new survey.

Domestic violence charity Refuge conducted a survey of 2,060 people, including 282 women aged 18-34, and found that this age range are twice as likely than the general population to have sexual photos of themselves used against them as revenge porn.

Revenge porn – the act of “sharing private sexual materials with intent to cause distress” – has been illegal in England and Wales since 2015. In July 2017, it was announced it had become a criminal offence in Scotland, with perpetrators at risk of spending up to five years in prison.

The survey showed that of the one in 14 women overall who had been threatened with revenge porn, 72 per cent were threatened by a current or former partner and of these

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Ryan Adams Apologizes To Mandy Moore And Other Women Who Accused Him Of Abuse

Christel Deskins

Ryan Adams performs onstage in 2014. (Photo: Brian Rasic via Getty Images)
Ryan Adams performs onstage in 2014. (Photo: Brian Rasic via Getty Images)

Singer-songwriter Ryan Adams — who was accused of sexual misconduct and psychological abuse last year by several women, including ex-wife Mandy Moore — apologized for his past “harmful behavior.”

In a letter published in The Daily Mail Friday, the prolific musician expressed regret for how he “mistreated people throughout my life and career,” adding that, after this “period of isolation and reflection,” he’s now sober and in therapy.  

“All I can say is that I’m sorry. It’s that simple,” Adams wrote. “That being said, no amount of growth will ever take away the suffering I had caused. I will never be off the hook and I am fully accountable for my harmful behavior, and will be for my actions moving forward.”

The New York Times published an expose in February 2019 detailing Adams’ alleged pattern of manipulative and

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