study

Google, Amazon Funnel Money to Virus Conspiracy Sites: Study

(Bloomberg) — Digital advertising platforms run by Google, Amazon.com Inc. and other tech companies will funnel at least $25 million to websites spreading misinformation about Covid-19 this year, according to a study released Wednesday.

Google’s platforms will provide $19 million, or $3 out of every $4 that the misinformation sites get in ad revenue. OpenX, a smaller digital ad distributor, handles about 10% of the money, while Amazon’s technology delivers roughly $1.7 million, or 7%, of the digital marketing spending these sites will receive, according to a research group called the Global Disinformation Index.

GDI made the estimates in a study that analyzed ads running between January and June on 480 English language websites identified as publishers of virus misinformation. Some of the ads were for brands including cosmetics giant L’Oreal SA, furniture website Wayfair Inc. and imaging technology company Canon Inc. The data exclude social-media and online-video services, so

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From Bandanas to DIY Masks, This Is How Effective Your Face Covering Is, a Study Says

As scientists learn more about how the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads, we’ve gone from the CDC’s nonmandatory recommendation of face masks to businesses and even states requiring their use in public, all in an effort to slow the pandemic. Bandanas, neck gaiters, homemade cloth face masks, and off-the-shelf cone masks are all acceptable, but research had yet to look at which form of non-medical-grade mask is the most effective.

A new study in Physics of Fluids has now done just that – and gone one step further, visualizing the effectiveness of different masks through a striking set of images (available on the journal’s website). To run the experiment, researchers used a mannequin head and a fog machine to emulate coughs and sneezes. They strapped different kinds of face masks onto the mannequin and tested how far and fast the emulated “respiratory jet” of drops and particles could travel.

How Do

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Wondering What Kind of Face Mask to Buy? These Are the Most Effective Options, Study Finds

Scientific research has proven that masks are one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of the new coronavirus, COVID-19. The highly contagious virus can easily infect other people through respiratory droplets from coughs, sneezes or even just talking, if people are standing close together — and especially if they’re indoors.

While a tightly fitted respirator mask is best for protecting a person and anyone around them from spreading COVID-19, a nationwide shortage of those masks means they should be reserved for frontline workers. That leaves the average person with a few options for non-medical face masks. Which ones are most effective?

A group of researchers at Florida Atlantic University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science set out to answer that question, and found that sewn, multi-layered masks — like the ones readily available on Etsy and from many clothing brands — were most effective, followed by cone-style

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‘Mommy brain’ might make new mothers forgetful but it doesn’t last finds new study

New US research has found that “mommy brain,” which is thought to leave new mothers feeling forgetful and less able to pay attention to things, doesn’t last, and in fact, a mother’s attention may actually improve.

Carried out by researchers at Purdue University, the new study looked at 70 non-mothers and 60 mothers who were at least one year postpartum, and compared their reaction times for a computer test where they had to press a button that corresponded to the location of an arrow on the screen.

The participants also completed a survey which asked them questions such as, “How sleepy do you feel?” and “How do you think your attentiveness is?”

The findings, published online in the journal Current Psychology, showed that the mothers performed just as well or even better on the computer test than women who had never been pregnant or had no children, and even though

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British people unaware their usued tech could be worth thousands, study finds

iPhones and Macbooks among those become less valuable as time goes on: iStock
iPhones and Macbooks among those become less valuable as time goes on: iStock

Britons are sitting on technology worth £16.5bn that they no longer use – and it could drop in value by £3.5bn over the next year.

Researchers found the typical adult has a staggering £598 worth of superfluous gadgets – simply collecting dust and cluttering their homes.

But during the past year, smartphones, computers, tablets, games consoles and wearables collectively depreciated in value by an average of 20 per cent.

Although, in that time iPhones dropped by an average of 36 per cent overall, according to industry figures from musicMagpie.

In fact, the iPhone XS dropped by £259, while the iPhone 7 and 8 fell £71 and £114 respectively.

Over the past 12 months, Samsung phones such as the Galaxy S10+ also depreciated by £127 and the MacBook Pro Core i7 dropped £105.

Similarly, some tablet devices plummeted

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