rules

Everything you need to know about travelling abroad this summer following today’s changes in quarantine rules

Summer holidays abroad could be back on but what will they look like? (Getty Images)
Summer holidays abroad could be back on but what will they look like? (Getty Images)

Back in June when the government announced the introduction of strict travel measures that would see anyone arriving from abroad have to isolate for 14 days, we saw our summer holiday hopes fade quicker than our post-holiday tans.

But summer 2020 could well be back on with the arrival of travel corridors and a long list of countries now exempt from England’s stringent quarantine rules.

From today July 10, anyone arriving from the list of countries will not have to isolate for 14 days on arrival into England.

“The government is satisfied that it is now safe to ease these measures in England and has introduced travel corridor exemptions for some countries and territories,” the new guidance states.

Additionally while previously advising against all but essential travel the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has now

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

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Supreme Court rules generic website names can be trademarked

The USPTO, among others, suggested that allowing Booking.com to claim the trademark would harm other travel companies with the word “booking” in their domain names. Federal trademark law defines generic terms as those that don’t make a service or product distinct from other ones. It prevents companies from staking an exclusive claim to commonly used words such as “tailor” or “laundromat” in store names.

Booking.com claimed that people associate its brand with reservations and that denying its trademark application could lead to consumers becoming misled. In writing the Supreme Court’s majority opinion, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sided with the company, suggesting that public perception of a name is the core issue. 

“[If] Booking.com were generic, we might expect consumers to understand Travelocity — another such service — to be a Booking.com,” Ginsburg wrote. “We might similarly expect that a consumer, searching for a trusted source of online hotel-reservation services, could

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Beaches are opening up in Canada, but what rules apply?

Beaches are opening up in Canada, but what rules apply?
Beaches are opening up in Canada, but what rules apply?

Beaches are either open — or starting to open — in Canada for the season.

But this year will be different. COVID-19 has made physical distancing a top priority, and officials are taking steps to ensure Canadians can have a safe and enjoyable beach visit.

But things are changing quickly.

While some beaches opened in Ontario earlier this month, for example, all beaches in the South Bruce Peninsula were promptly closed after thousands of people crammed themselves into small spaces along sandy shores, sparking fears of a COVID-19 resurgence.

The closure speaks to our current climate of uncertainty as officials try to balance public health and leisurely activities.

TOURIST DESTINATIONS ABROAD SETTING THE TREND?

As tourism cautiously opens up around the world, some sea-side destinations are taking precautions to make sure their beaches remain safe.

In Canet D’en Berengeur on

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5 rules every virtual wedding guest should follow

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, many engaged couples had to press pause on their dream weddings. Some decided to postpone their celebrations, but many others opted to host a virtual wedding ceremony so they could keep their original date while family and friends call or video in.

Online weddings are a fairly new phenomenon for everyone, and if you’ve been invited to one, you may not be sure what to expect. From dress codes to gift giving and everything in between, there’s a whole unique set of etiquette rules for virtual wedding ceremonies. TODAY Style consulted the experts to help you navigate this uncharted territory like a pro.

COVID-19 Stay safe Stay connected. Happy young couple video calling friends using laptop at home. Man and woman online chatting with family during coronavirus lockdown and social distancing. (Getty Images)
COVID-19 Stay safe Stay connected. Happy young couple video calling friends using laptop at home. Man and woman online chatting with family during coronavirus lockdown and social distancing. (Getty Images)

1. Virtual weddings are not an excuse to dress sloppily

One of

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Online or in the classroom, teachers and students must show up every day, new rules say

Observing physical distance, first-grade teacher Caitlin Hicks gives an air hug to Sid Solomon, 6, as she meets students one final time in June, when students pick up schoolwork left behind after Center Street Elementary in El Segundo closed in March. <span class="copyright">(Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Observing physical distance, first-grade teacher Caitlin Hicks gives an air hug to Sid Solomon, 6, as she meets students one final time in June, when students pick up schoolwork left behind after Center Street Elementary in El Segundo closed in March. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

When it comes to education, the new state budget goes beyond providing $70.5 billion in funding for K-12 schools — it sets fundamental accountability rules for a new era of distance learning in California by requiring teachers to take online attendance and document student learning.

The budget bill, which Gov. Gavin Newsom is expected to sign, anticipates that schools will continue to rely heavily on online instruction when campuses reopen in the fall. It also implicitly acknowledges the deep learning losses of the last semester, especially among students from low-income families, when school systems struggled to get all students online.

The new

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