Maya Hawke on debut album, famous parents and dealing with online trolls at 14

Christel Deskins

Maya Hawke played the best show of her life. Then the apocalypse happened.” data-reactid=”6″Maya Hawke played the best show of her life. Then the apocalypse happened.

Ethan Hawke, was in full embarrassing dad mode, clapping and proudly calling her name from a table midvenue. Afterward, she went to a bar in Greenwich Village where she shamelessly played early 2000s pop on a jukebox, much to her musician pals’ chagrin. ” data-reactid=”7″In mid-March, just four days before New York went into COVID-19 lockdown, the actress/singer performed an intimate concert at the city’s famed Joe’s Pub. Her father, actor Ethan Hawke, was in full embarrassing dad mode, clapping and proudly calling her name from a table midvenue. Afterward, she went to a bar in Greenwich Village where she shamelessly played early 2000s pop on a jukebox, much to her musician pals’ chagrin. 

Uma Thurman. (Her mom and dad divorced in 2005

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Tech barriers to remote learning send parents scrambling, expose ‘digital chasm’

Christel Deskins

Matielyn Jones, a mom of two from Georgia, did everything she could to help her school-age son succeed as he navigates remote learning this semester — investing in a new laptop, desk and chair so he could be as prepared as possible to succeed in his virtual classes.

When her son’s first day of third grade rolled around, however, his school district’s remote learning portal abruptly crashed. Jones, who recently left her full-time job mostly to help her children with virtual learning this semester, felt helpless.

“It made me laugh a little on the inside, I think our teachers are doing the best they can, and our system, they’re trying,” Jones said. “I knew we’d have a bumpy start.”

PHOTO: Matielyn Jones said she bought her son a new laptop, desk and chair for his virtual semester amid the coronavirus pandemic. (Courtesy Matielyn Jones)

Still, Jones said while she

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Many Schools Are Using a Hybrid Learning Model This Year; Here’s What Parents Should Know

Christel Deskins

going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are setting up “pandemic pods” – where a small group of students of similar ages and abilities gathers at one family’s home to learn from a teacher – others are working with their local districts using a hybrid learning model.” data-reactid=”19″Depending on what part of the US you live in, going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are

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Parents go into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Christel Deskins

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, and many blame the cost of their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

survey from Credit Karma  examines how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.” data-reactid=”13″A survey from Credit Karma  examines how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.

The reasons for the debt are higher grocery prices and the sudden switch to at-home schooling in March.

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Expert answers most-Googled questions about working parents and back-to-school

Christel Deskins

With the future unpredictable as kids return to the classroom during the coronavirus epidemic, parents are turning to Google to ask questions and attempt to plan.

As a part of TODAY’s coronavirus and the classroom series, NBC senior business correspondent Stephanie Ruhle answered the three most-Googled questions about the 2020-2021 school year, offering advice on everything from setting up a schedule that works to how to juggle work responsibilities while supervising online learning.

How are working parents doing this?

While Ruhle acknowledges working parents are stressed and struggling, she says it’s important to make a plan, but stay flexible.

“Put together a plan and an actual schedule,” said Ruhle, who likens the work and school routine to maternity leave; when baby sleeps, that’s when mom gets time to shower or nap herself. “When that school day starts, that’s when you can get the most out of your work day.”

Ruhle

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Parents are going into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Christel Deskins

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, with a large share blaming the cost of paying for their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

That’s according to a new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.

The reasons for the debt are higher grocery prices and the sudden switch to at-home schooling in March.

Learning spaces at home: How to create an A+ space for learning at home

Delaying college has a price: Study says students could lose $90K over their

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what parents need to know

Christel Deskins

The good news – and more than good, in some ways it feels miraculous – is that 11-year-old Phoebe South is genuinely looking forward to starting secondary school in September. “I feel quite excited about it now,” she tells me, from a beach in Devon where she’s on holiday with her family. “I know one of my best friends is going to be in the same bubble as me, and I know quite a lot about what to expect.”

That she feels this way is tribute to all the work of her new school, Wykham Park academy in Banbury, Oxfordshire, to prepare for the influx of year 7 students in a few weeks’ time. Transition to secondary school can be difficult in the best of years – and 2020 is far from that.

“By this stage in a normal year the new year 7s would have been into school to

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Nut allergy warnings added to previously ‘safe’ ice creams prompting complaints from parents

Christel Deskins

A range of Unilever products have had nut allergy warnings added to them as part of a more stringent policy - Mike Egerton/PA
A range of Unilever products have had nut allergy warnings added to them as part of a more stringent policy – Mike Egerton/PA

Nut allergy warnings have been added to previously “safe” ice cream prompting complaints from parents that their children are being unfairly denied their favourites.

A petition set up by the mother of a teenage allergy sufferer has urged Unilever to roll back changes that have seen “may contain almonds” and warnings over hazelnuts added to some of its popular ice cream brands, including Magnums and Cornetto.

Unilever said the warnings were added as part of a new, more stringent labelling policy and that it has increased its range of ice cream suitable for those with allergies in recent years. It said consumer safety was its priority.

However, last night Nadim and Tanya Ednan-Laperouse, whose daughter Natasha died in 2016 after eating a Pret a Manger baguette, said

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Parents must be allowed to pick their poison this school year

Christel Deskins

The usual debates in education circles aren’t helping right now.

These conversations — about school choice and vouchers and equity, public vs. private vs. charter vs. home, standardized testing and screen time and district residency rules and teachers’ unions — can’t be suspended as COVID-19 spikes around the country ahead of the start of the fall semester. But in their status quo version, such debates are distorting the more pressing matter of getting through this hell year. It won’t work to shoehorn discussion of this semester into our normal policy frameworks.

Perhaps instead of sticking to those ordinary patterns, we could start with two presuppositions: Just about every option will be worse for disadvantaged students. And families should be given as many choices as possible to navigate this fall.

Parents must be allowed to pick their poison.

Consider how re-openings will affect disadvantaged students. If public schools open their doors,

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Privileged parents form COVID pandemic pods that widen education gaps. We can do better.

Christel Deskins

I saw a Tesla with #BlackLivesMatter written on the rear windshield the other day. It appeared to be a parent picking up their kid from a “pandemic pod,” which, if you’re not familiar, is a small cluster of families who pool resources to hire a private tutor, who may be a parent. These pods are very popular among my neighbors in the Bay Area of California. Nearby I could see a YMCA, which provides child care and after-school programming. It shut down due to COVID-19.

I’m not the first to point out that pods are emblematic of educational inequity in the United States. It’s a winner-take-all approach, with privileged, often mostly white students hoarding academic and social gains and further segregating our K-12 systems. This hypocrisy is why pod parents make me so angry. If Black lives matter, doesn’t that include Black children? What about Black futures?

Pods don’t just

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