pandemic

How the sound of religion has changed in the pandemic

<span class="caption">The Rev. Philip Dinwiddie sings to a pre-recording of mass at St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile, Michigan.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/the-rev-philip-dinwiddie-sings-in-his-office-adding-music-news-photo/1220888445?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gregory Shamus/Getty Images">Gregory Shamus/Getty Images</a></span>
The Rev. Philip Dinwiddie sings to a pre-recording of mass at St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile, Michigan. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Things sound different in a lockdown. The silence of usually bustling streets, the two-tone whirr of ambulance sirens and the sudden awareness of birdsong, all formed an aural backdrop to the coronavirus pandemic.

Nowhere has the change in sound been more noticeable than at houses of worship. The voices of congregants praying, chanting and singing has been quietened in churches, mosques and temples. Instead, congregants have had to work in new acoustic settings, both in person and online.

In short, religion, too, sounds different during the pandemic. We know this, because we have been documenting the sounds of religious life in America. Over the last six years, our teams of faculty and student researchers at Michigan State University and The Ohio State University have cataloged hundreds of audio

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The coronavirus pandemic forced many people in Connecticut to work from home. Power outages from Tropical Storm Isaias could send some back to the office.

The coronavirus pandemic forced legions of office workers in Connecticut to work at home to stop the spread, but the strategy hit a major disruption when Tropical Storm Isaias knocked out power — and in many cases, internet — to hundreds of thousands of utility customers in the state.

Major employers in the Hartford area said Wednesday they were coping with how the loss of power was affecting employees working remotely. In some cases, shifting responsibilities to employees who did have power. Some were even considering allowing some workers to come back to the office on a temporary basis.

Travelers Cos., a property-casualty insurer employs 7,000 in the Hartford area, said it is being as flexible as possible as employees deal with power loss, internet problems and storm damage.

“Colleagues from other parts of the company are able to support those who have been affected by Isaias so that we

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Is It Safe To Go Boating During The Coronavirus Pandemic?

Recreational boating has become a popular activity amid the pandemic. (Photo: Cliff Hawkins via Getty Images)
Recreational boating has become a popular activity amid the pandemic. (Photo: Cliff Hawkins via Getty Images)

With traditional summer activities and travel plans largely on hold, people are seeking safe ways to enjoy the season amid the COVID-19 pandemic. One popular approach is recreational boating. 

It’s not just your Instagram feed suggesting that boat trips are all the rage this summer. The data backs it up.

“We’ve seen a huge surge in boat rentals,” Jackie Baumgarten, founder and CEO of peer-to-peer boat rental marketplace Boatsetter, told HuffPost. “Without increasing our marketing, Boatsetter recorded our highest ever booking numbers for the month of June. Peer-to-peer rentals were up 74% compared to the same time last year.”

She also noted that Boatsetter listings have increased 40% as people seek to offset the coast of boat ownership during the recession. Meanwhile, demand has spread beyond traditional boating markets like Florida and Southern California

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How the Pandemic Is Changing the Way Retailers Pick Product for Kids & the Whole Family

Heading into a spring season unlike any other, how top retailers are buying — and what they’re betting on.

Will Cooper, SVP & GMM of women’s shoes, Saks Fifth Avenue, New York

More from Footwear News

Buying Logistics: “We are currently conducting all market appointments digitally. Vendors have enhanced photography of their collections, with many adding video content to actually see the shoe on a model. We have adapted to this new way of working through leveraging technology, but anticipate returning to the showroom when it is safe to do so.”

Trend Talk: “Through the pandemic, we have seen our customers focused on casual shoes, particularly sneakers and flat sandals, and we expect this to continue into spring ’21. We are excited to see designers elevating casual shoes with embellishments to make women feel ‘dressed up’ while still wearing a casual and more comfortable look. We will continue to offer

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5 things I wish I’d known before I moved amid the COVID-19 pandemic

How to safely move during a pandemic
How to safely move during a pandemic

Moving during a pandemic? It can be done. Carefully, thoughtfully and exhaustingly. 

The coronavirus crisis has gripped the USA since March and shows no signs of abating. And although much of normal life has changed or ceased, there are things that have to go on, like moving. 

Maybe your lease is up. Maybe you need to combine your household with others in your family for financial reasons. Maybe you were already in the process of changing homes and you can’t put it off.

Whatever the reason, many of you, like me and my husband, will have to brave this huge life change under difficult circumstances. It was not easy to maintain precautions against COVID-19 while packing, working with movers and combining households. Here are five things I wish I had known before I moved during coronavirus: 

What to buy: How to move safely

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How pandemic pods and zutors are changing home-schooling

When the number of coronavirus cases began to rise in the San Francisco area in early July, mother of one Lian Chikako Chang started a Facebook group to support local families and teachers who were suddenly facing the prospect of schools not opening in person as planned in mid-August.

The “Pandemic Pods” group, which aims to help with childcare and schooling needs, grew to more than 30,000 members within three weeks, as areas across the US were hit by Covid-19 spikes and more schools decided to stay shut.

“Families were left scrabbling for solutions,” says Ms Chang. “Most parents have to work, and most jobs are not compatible with home-schooling”.

And it’s not just Facebook parents are turning to. Matchmaking apps and websites have sprung up offering to help parents connect with other families to form “safe” learning pods, or match them with teachers who can give online lessons, dubbed

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Virtual house hunting gets a pandemic boost

It’s Saturday evening in London, and I’m house shopping in Dublin, thanks to a virtual-reality headset.

Temporarily forgetting she is sitting beside me, I shout to my wife: “I’m in the children’s bedroom.”

We can’t go to the Republic of Ireland ourselves to do this. Travellers from Great Britain need to restrict their movements for a fortnight, so nipping over and back is off the cards.

But I can take several paces through a virtual seaside flat in Dublin’s Dún Laoghaire, while based in our south London home.

Circles appear on the floor of the Dublin flat and, using hand controls, I can glide between them and explore.

Standing in each circle, I can peer up, down, whichever way I like. It is immersive and I feel as though I’m there, even if moving about feels a bit like using Google Street View.

Welcome to house shopping in the age

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How pandemic pods and zutors are changing homeschooling

When the number of coronavirus cases began to rise in the San Francisco area in early July, mother of one Lian Chikako Chang started a Facebook group to support local families and teachers who were suddenly facing the prospect of schools not opening in person as planned in mid-August.

The “Pandemic Pods” group, which aims to help with childcare and schooling needs, grew to more than 30,000 members within three weeks, as areas across the US were hit by Covid-19 spikes and more schools decided to stay shut.

“Families were left scrabbling for solutions,” says Ms Chang. “Most parents have to work, and most jobs are not compatible with homeschooling”.

And it’s not just Facebook parents are turning to. Matchmaking apps and websites have sprung up offering to help parents connect with other families to form “safe” learning pods, or match them with teachers who can give online lessons, dubbed

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A psychologist explains why people shouldn’t feel guilty taking time off from work during the pandemic

While the boundaries between work and life are blurrier than ever, many are realizing that their busiest days are still disguised as “leisure time” because they’re working from the comfort of their homes. This new work-life balance, or lack thereof, is causing some employees to be hesitant to cash in on their hard-earned vacation days.

Yahoo Life Mental Health Contributor Jen Hartstein shares ways why taking time off is more vital than ever.

“We’re at this very weird time where work and life are blending all the time. And for many we feel like it’s not the right time to take time off,” she explains. “Maybe we aren’t going anywhere, we’re not traveling, so we kind of figure, ‘Why bother?’” 

However, it’s important for us to take time off because “the more space we create, the better and more rejuvenated we come back to the office and to work,” she

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Pandemic revs up race for U.S. online car sales

By Nick Carey

DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) – After years of being part of a future that never quite arrived, the coronavirus pandemic has put U.S. online car sellers on the map.

Now comes a race to spend vast sums on digital commerce platforms specifically designed to handle auto sales. Without deep pockets, many startups and others trying to join the online game will likely be left in the dust.

“The big three (auto) e-commerce players will grow substantially, but it will be hard to be a new entrant,” said Toby Russell, joint chief executive officer of Shift, which will go public to join rival Carvana <CVNA.N> and Vroom <VRM.O> later this quarter.

“The pay to play on this thing is in the hundreds of millions and the early journey is hard, especially building out the technology,” Russell said.

Online sales still only account for around 1% of the roughly

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