law

Police detain prominent law professor and government critic as China’s crackdown continues

Chinese President Xi Jinping <span class="copyright">(Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)</span>
Chinese President Xi Jinping (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)

Tsinghua University law professor Xu Zhangrun, one of China’s few remaining outspoken critics of Chinese President Xi Jinping and the Communist government, was taken from his home in Beijing by police on Monday morning.

Close friends of Xu’s who spoke with his family confirmed that he had been arrested and that they did not know where the police had taken him.

About 20 police officers surrounded Xu’s home Monday morning while more than 10 others entered, searched the residence, confiscated his computer and then took Xu away, according to a statement from friends of Xu, which has been widely circulated among Chinese activists.

Police did not make any public statement about Xu’s arrest or any charges.

The Chinese legal expert had taught jurisprudence and constitutional law at Tsinghua, one of China’s most prestigious universities, but was suspended in 2019 after

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California’s Big Privacy Law Gets Teeth

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  • Enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act began July 1, after a six-month grace period on enforcement.

  • The CCPA gives California residents more control over data held by private companies, and many companies have extended the same controls to all U.S. residents.

  • Consumer Reports research shows that people trying to use the mandated controls often run into confusing red tape, and some ultimately give up on the process.

At the beginning of this year, a new law gave consumers in California unprecedented rights to control how companies use and sell their data—and many firms extended those rights to all Americans. But until today, California’s attorney general could not bring the hammer down on companies that didn’t comply.

The landmark California Consumer Privacy Act provided companies with a six-month grace period before enforcement started, and thousands of companies have scrambled

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Coronavirus drove a boom in virtual content; to protect artists, copyright law must catch up

John Krasinski's YouTube show "Some Good News" operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won't likely extend to its new platform, CBS. <span class="copyright">(YouTube)</span>
John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News” operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won’t likely extend to its new platform, CBS. (YouTube)

On April 19, Rainn Wilson (a.k.a. Dwight Schrute) appeared on John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News,” and warned his former “Office” cast member not to stream a Chance the Rapper song without first getting permission from the artist or the publishing company. Krasinski then brought Chance himself onto the show, and he gave the green light.

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated this type of abundant good will across media and entertainment businesses: DJs are spinning music free online; Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez are posting dances to popular songs on TikTok, Broadway performers are singing tributes to Stephen Sondheim on YouTube, art gallery exhibitions have gone virtual and professional athletes are playing video games on ESPN.

But all these well-intentioned efforts have

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