kids

Here’s Where to Buy Face Masks for Kids Online

I’ve been enjoying ’round-the-clock family time with my two girls since quarantine began, spending our time just outside New York City. Face masks for kids are essential, since our social distance outings have been walks on the beach, neighborhood strolls, and drive-by hellos past our family and friends’ homes. As an adult, I’ve gotten used to wearing a face covering in public, and so have my girls—they even remind me when I step out of the car, “Mommy, don’t forget your mask!” So when the Centers for Disease Control officially started recommending face coverings, it got me thinking about what to do to keep them—and others in our community—safe.

Under the guidelines, the CDC recommends that all children over the age of two “wear a cloth face covering their nose and mouth” in public settings to reduce the spread of the virus. Even though we spend the majority of our

Read More

Make a vaccine? I’m trying to teach my kids the alphabet

By Kate Holton, Emma Thomasson and Stephen Jewkes

LONDON/BERLIN/MILAN (Reuters) – It’s tough to do any useful work when you’re stuck at home, struggling to home-school bickering kids, let alone when you’re trying to produce a COVID-19 vaccine.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca <AZN.L> had spent years preparing for a pandemic, but when the moment finally came it was caught cold on a crucial front: stressed parents working from home struggled to focus.

    So the company recruited up to 80 teachers to run online lessons and repurposed a car parking app to book virtual classes. It also lined up personal tutoring and helped to locate some childcare spaces for those battling to adapt to the abrupt change to their lives.  

    The move by Britain’s biggest drugmaker, and similar efforts by companies the world over to host everything from magic classes to yoga for children, shows the lengths businesses are going to to

Read More

Whatever back to school looks like, it has to serve the kids without internet and tech

I’m USA TODAY editor-in-chief Nicole Carroll, and this is The Backstory, insights into our biggest stories of the week. If you’d like to get The Backstory in your inbox every week, sign up here.

This week, I got a survey from my son’s school. It asked, on a scale of “unsure” to “very comfortable,” how comfortable are you with your student attending in-person classes this fall?

This was in the same week we learned the U.S. could be headed toward 100,000 coronavirus cases a day, hospitalizations are rising in 12 states, hot spot Arizona delayed the start of its school year and the American Academy of Pediatrics urged schools to hold in-person classes because of the negative social, emotional and academic impact on kids.

I didn’t see an option for “of course I want kids back in school but don’t want students or teachers to get sick or spread the

Read More

Kids Can Take Free Online Drawing Classes From Disney Right Now

There is a lot about these past few months that have been strange and challenging. As more parents than ever are juggling working from home and caring for the kids, we have had to find creative ways to make the seemingly impossible juggle happen. Young kids, who are used to being fully engaged in daycare or school, now have to find ways to entertain themselves. And as parents, we have to find those activities that our kids can do on their own that allow us to get through another Zoom call or finish up our deadline.

Thankfully, the internet exists and with it comes a whole slew of activities that we can throw at our kids to keep their brain from turning to mush and our sanity intact. One of these activities comes from the a company that knows who to engage kid’s imagination–Disney. The company has released a collection

Read More

5 Upgrades for Safer, Healthier Kids’ Rooms and Nurseries

Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz - Getty Images
Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz – Getty Images

From House Beautiful

As technology gives cutting-edge innovations to improve our homes, it’s no surprise that the kids’ category is offering up new and improved products to care for our little ones, too. Whether you’re the sort of parent who’s super aware of your carbon footprint or you’re just looking to brush up on safety standards, here are five easy upgrades—from smarter paint choices to natural-fiber swaps—that will make your kids’ room a healthier place. Get ready to breathe easier—literally!

Paint on a Fresh Coat

If you haven’t already, paint your walls with zero-VOC, organic paint. Not only is it healthier, it can also speed up the decor process: less time waiting for fumes to dry means you can move in faster!

Older homes can leak fumes into the air long after the paint has dried, too. A 2018 study published in the Journal

Read More

Ivirlei Brookes on What It Means to Be an Ally and How to Talk to Your Kids About Race

“I don’t think people realize that it was really hard to film,” Ivirlei Brookes revealed to WrapWomen. The actress turned business and mindset coach recently went viral after posting this emotional yet informative video on how the non-Black community can become better allies.

“I was feeling extremely low and exhausted from all the arguing I was seeing online,” said Brookes. “I decided to make a video for Black people to use as a tool – they could send the video link to their white friends when they didn’t have enough energy left to explain.”

Brookes recorded the video on Instagram live with 11 viewers tuned in. Afterwards, she uploaded it to IGTV and within one week the video had over 5.8 million views. It even caught the attention of white celebrities including Hailey Bieber, Lili Reinhart, Ellen Pompeo, Ariel Winter, Nolan Gould among others who reposted the call to action.

Read More

Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More