97 per cent of Nova Scotians will be able to access high-speed internet by fall 2022

Christel Deskins



a close up of a map: Nova Scotia announces plans to bring reliable high-speed internet to most of the province


© Develop Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia announces plans to bring reliable high-speed internet to most of the province

As we isolate ourselves during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s revealed just how reliant we are on having access to high-speed internet to keep up with our daily routines.

From at-home learning to accessing e-health or doing business or just keeping in touch with friends, if you don’t have reliable internet it’s hard to take part in the online experience.

Read more: Coronavirus has exacerbated the issue of internet access in rural Maritime communities

That’s why Premier Stephen McNeil thanked Nova Scotians Tuesday at a high-speed internet announcement in the rural town of Mount Uniake, where the Nova Scotia Internet Funding Trust was allocating another $59 million to increasing internet connectivity across the province.

“Thanks for your patience, we understand the importance of this,” said McNeil, who announced the details of the phase

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‘Living in my car’? Fall semester online means college students are scrambling for housing, Wi-Fi

Christel Deskins

When California State University announced May 12 the school would be online for the fall semester, Graciela Moran thought she might end up homeless.

The San Bernardino student is immunocompromised and had been living in her dorm as a residential assistant. But along with the Cal State announcement, her contract ended and her stipend was taken away. Her father, a carpet installer, had to keep working during the city’s increase in coronavirus infections, so she couldn’t move home without putting herself at risk.

“I was really thinking about living in my car,” she said. Her mind raced as she weighed finding a full-time job that would allow her to afford an apartment.

But the college stepped in. A COVID-19 relief fund from the Basic Needs Department provided the fifth-year senior, who is also the school’s student body president, with the payment she needed to stay in her dorm room. When

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Flu shot will be essential this fall, Federal government extends CERB, offers new COVID-19 benefits

Christel Deskins

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

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Bid By Phone, Online, Or In-Person For The Carlisle Fall Auction

Christel Deskins

⚡️ Read the full article on Motorious

Buying that dream car is simple and easy now that phone bidding is now available at all Carlisle Auctions.

The Carlisle Fall Auction is part of the Fall Carlisle event (automotive flea market and car corral) will take place from September 30th through October 4th on the Carlisle Fairgrounds. If there is a particular car that has caught your eye, don’t worry if you can’t be on site to bid in person. Make sure to “register to bid” here, and then feel free to contact an Auction Specialist via phone by dialing (717) 960-6400 to place your bid on the lot of your choice. Also, bidding online is available through EDGE Pipeline.

A 1976 Pontiac Trans Am is a featured vehicle heading to the Carlisle Fall Auction

The Carlisle Fall Auction will take place at the Carlisle Expo center daily starting at

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9 ways to get through at-home learning this fall, from teachers

Christel Deskins

As schools across the United States reopen for the 2020-21 school year either completely online or with an online learning option amid continuing concerns about COVID-19, a lot of parents are finding themselves supervising their children’s school days.

The thought of being responsible for their children’s academic experiences is daunting for parents who are trying to juggle multiple children or working from home — especially after last spring’s sudden school shutdown and the crisis learning that followed.

Watch TODAY All Day! Get the best news, information and inspiration from TODAY, all day long.

Knowing that everyone is overwhelmed right now, we asked teachers — including Sarah Brown Wessling, the 2010 National Teacher of the Year — to give their best advice to parents preparing for this unconventional school year.

1. Set the scene

Wessling, an English teacher at Johnson High School in Des Moines, Iowa, told TODAY Parents it’s important

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Big-Box Chains to Make Big Gains, Off-Price Could Fall Victim to COVID-19

Christel Deskins

It’s a big earnings week for retail.

Four of the country’s largest nationwide chains — big-boxes Walmart and Target, department store Kohl’s and off-pricer TJX — are set to report second-quarter financial results over the course of the next few days. (Alibaba and Foot Locker also report earnings on Thursday and Friday, respectively.)

More from Footwear News

The numbers come at a precarious time for the retail sector, whose challenges amid shifting consumer habits and the rise of e-commerce have been compounded by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Government-imposed lockdowns and COVID-19 fears have already significantly impacted both top and bottom lines in the first quarter, albeit in different ways: For Walmart and Target, panicked shoppers drove a surge in sales of essential goods, while physical-first companies like Kohl’s, TJ Maxx and Marshalls took a huge hit as store traffic dwindled and, in most cases, completely halted for weeks.

As we

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Christel Deskins

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all? 

In many cases, it comes back to money. 

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments. 

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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After Big Ten postponement, Ohio State QB Justin Fields creates online petition to advocate for a fall season

Christel Deskins

Justin Fields has resorted to creating an internet petition to advocate to play football this fall.

The Ohio State quarterback created a petition on MoveOn.org directed to Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren and school presidents and athletic directors in the conference under the #WeWantToPlay hashtag. The Big Ten was the first Power Five conference to postpone football to the spring of 2021 when it made the abrupt decision on Tuesday.

“We, the football players of the Big Ten, together with the fans and supporters of college football, request that the Big Ten Conference immediately reinstate the 2020 football season,” Fields’ petition states. “Allow Big Ten players/teams to make their own choice as to whether they wish to play or opt out this fall season. Allow Big Ten players/teams who choose to opt out of playing a fall season to do so without penalty or repercussion.

“Why is this important?

“We

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Ohio State QB Justin Fields creates petition to play in fall

Christel Deskins

Justin Fields has resorted to creating an internet petition to advocate to play football this fall.

The Ohio State QB created a petition on MoveOn.org directed to Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren and school presidents and athletic directors in the conference under the #WeWantToPlay hashtag. The Big Ten was the first Power Five conference to postpone football to the spring of 2021 when it made the abrupt decision on Tuesday.

“We, the football players of the Big Ten, together with the fans and supporters of college football, request that the Big Ten Conference immediately reinstate the 2020 football season,” Fields’ petition states. “Allow Big Ten players/teams to make their own choice as to whether they wish to play or opt out this fall season. Allow Big Ten players/teams who choose to opt out of playing a fall season to do so without penality or repercussion.

Why is this important?

We

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How to open schools the right way this fall

Christel Deskins

Of all the challenges COVID-19 has thrown at us, nothing is more daunting than figuring out how to open and operate schools this fall. The problems are complex, multifaceted and impact almost all of us. As an education official in Richmond, Virginia said:  “…planning for reopening school this fall is like playing a game of 3-D chess while standing on one leg in the middle of a hurricane.” 

That’s a simile as powerful as it is apt. (It also kind of sounds like Mr. Spock-meets-Jumpin’ Jack Flash.)

And this most fraught back-to-school of all time has begun of course. (Depending on where you live, kids return to school as early as the first week of August or as late as the second week of September. Every one of the nation’s 13,000 school districts has its own calendar. Ditto for colleges and universities.) But opening day is just the starting point.

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