fall

Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Online school? In-person? How parents are making their own fall 2020 decisions as COVID-19 squabbles continue

As officials play political football with K-12 school re-openings, parents such as Johanne Davis are formulating their own game plans for the fall.

“To exercise an abundance of caution, I’d like to keep my kids home with me where they’ll study online,” says Davis, a mother of three from Indian Land, South Carolina, one of countless states where COVID-19 cases have spiked in recent weeks.

“Health is the issue, not just for my children, but also school workers,” says Davis. “Teachers shouldn’t have to be frontline soldiers in this pandemic.”

Families across the nation are busy making their own calculations about whether to send children back to school. While Davis seems resolved, many parents are still mulling.

Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they're both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend a lot of next year studying remotely. But she acknowledges that hers is a privileged position not afforded to lower-income parents grappling with child care in order to go off to work.
Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they’re both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend
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Keep it simple, Democrats. Job One is making sure Americans can cast votes this fall.

Democrats and many others are determined to defeat a toxic president and win governing power to beat back the pandemic, root out institutional racism, and build a robust, equitable economic recovery. Four months out, this all looks possible. Most Americans have never liked Donald Trump or the Republican agenda, and even fewer approve after their bungling efforts to limit damage from the pandemic. But mid-summer polls are not votes.

Nothing matters more right now for presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s campaign and its party and civic allies than taking specific steps to make sure that disillusioned Americans can actually vote this fall. Unfortunately, there are worrying signs of premature triumphalism. Too many liberals and progressives are debating policy details or diverting into battles about statues and implausible slogans. Even those concerned with ballot access are investing too much in lawsuits, long after conservative Supreme Court Justices (ruling from home) have

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Ontario’s Stage 3 of reopening could mean bigger gatherings, more testing as fall comes

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,600 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 7

5:00 p.m.: P.E.I.’s top doctor strengthens mask recommendation

Dr. Heather Morrison, the chief public health officer of Prince

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International students must leave USA if universities offer only online classes this fall

The Trump administration announced international students will have to leave the USA, or face possible deportation, if the college or university they attend switches to online-only classes in the fall because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Similarly, international students enrolled in colleges or universities offering only online courses this fall will be barred from entering the USA.

In the spring, international students were allowed to attend online-only classes. The reversal could be a major economic blow to colleges and universities, as well as  communities, over the loss of tuition and other revenue from international students who typically pay full price.

Related video: Colleges detail what it could look like when they reopen for fall 2020

Colleges and universities are implementing layoffs, furloughs and other cost-clotting measures to offset a loss in revenue amid the coronavirus pandemic as more people defer college.

US coronavirus map: Tracking the outbreak

The new policy, issued

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes while in U.S.

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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International students must leave US if universities only offer online classes this fall

The Trump administration announced international students will have to leave the United States, or face possible deportation, if the college or university they attend switches to online-only classes in the fall because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Similarly, international students enrolled in colleges or universities offering only online courses this fall will be barred from entering the U.S.

The news comes as some colleges and universities, including Harvard University, say they will only offer online classes in the fall to protect students and staff from the new coronavirus.

The move, a reversal from the spring when international students were allowed to remain in the U.S. to attend online-only classes, could represent a major economic blow to colleges and universities as well as local communities over the loss of tuition and other revenue from international students who typically pay full price.

It comes at a time when colleges and universities are are

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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College students are preparing to return to campus in the fall. Is it worth it?

Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, Gomi Zou signs onto her computer to virtually attend her communications class: a recorded lecture voiced by her professor against the backdrop of a black screen.

“I spend five hours each weekday watching lectures on my computer, which doesn’t include prep and doing assignments for classes,” she said.

Zou, 22, is a senior taking online summer classes at the University of California, Los Angeles, which plans to offer classes in person with the option of remote learning this fall. Along with millions of college students across the United States, she transitioned to online instruction when college campuses closed to curb the spread of the coronavirus back in March.

For students like Zou, taking online classes was a difficult adjustment. Many were devastated to leave campuses prematurely, part ways with friends, and finish the rest of the semester over Zoom calls. Some reported concerns about a

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USC reverses robust fall reopening plans, asks students to stay home for online classes

USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Amid the alarming surge in coronavirus spread, USC announced it will no longer bring all undergraduates back to campus for the fall semester and will move to mainly online classes, reversing an earlier decision to welcome students back for a hybrid model.

The decision, announced by Provost Charles Zukoski late Wednesday, came the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom announced tougher restrictions on indoor activities. Zukoski recommended that students not return to campus for the semester and instead continue their education online.

“The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has altered every aspect of our lives — the way we interact, work, and socialize — and with each new permutation of the pandemic, we must find ways to thrive,” Zukoski wrote.

“Given the continuing safety restrictions and limited

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