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Facebook has failed to control hate speech. Will advertiser demands change anything?

Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive and national director of the Anti-Defamation League, was not all that optimistic in advance of the online meeting that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg had set up with him and the heads of other civil rights groups last Tuesday.

Many of them had been talking to Facebook about its tolerance of hate groups and racist and anti-Semitic postings on the giant social media company’s website.

They had submitted 10 recommendations they said could result immediately in “real progress.” Facebook had stated that it takes “a zero tolerance approach” to hateful posts on its services by removing them.

We’re talking about literally the most sophisticated advertising platform in the history of capitalism. The idea that they can’t find the Nazis on their platform is just laughable.

Jonathan Greenblatt, Anti-Defamation League

Yet the very morning of the meeting, ADL’s researchers turned up a posting

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Will the Facebook advertising boycott force the social media giant to change? Not likely

Hundreds of advertisers say they won’t spend money on Facebook in July or beyond over concerns the social media company isn’t doing enough to stop hate speech.  But the exodus of spenders may not be enough to push CEO Mark Zuckerberg to make the level of change that critics are demanding. 

Critics have an initial list of 10 recommendations that they say would help Facebook corral hate speech and make civil rights a priority when moderating content.

Zuckerberg and top executives, who have agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the Stop Hate for Profit boycott this week, plan to release the company’s third civil rights audit, which Facebook says will address many of the activists’ concerns, as well as other policy changes that were already under consideration.

The pressure on Facebook seems intense, but it may not be as powerful as the headlines make it appear.

Brands

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Done with Facebook? Consider MeWe, Parler or old standbys such as LinkedIn

MeWe is a social network that says it has no ads, spyware, targeting, political bias, or newsfeed manipulation. In other words, it bills itself as the “anti” Facebook. 

Parler is a social media app with one point of view: conservative. It’s a place for folks who don’t like the spin at Facebook, or as it describes itself, “free expression without violence and a lack of censorship.”

So maybe, like Coca-Cola, Unilver, Starbucks and other corporations, you’ve had it with Facebook and its policies about either not curbing hate speech, or if you’re on the other side of the aisle, censoring free thought. 

Where to go? We have some ideas for you. 

MeWe bills itself as the "anti-Facebook."
MeWe bills itself as the “anti-Facebook.”

Controversy: Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

Social: Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

LinkedIn

Yes, that network that for years was thought of

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Facebook Business Page Tips That Will Help You Make More Money

If you own a business, you need a web presence. First and foremost, that means you should have a great website. There’s no way around that. But what about social media? Is it necessary to have a Facebook business page?

Let’s see. In December 2019, Facebook had an average of 1.66 billion daily active users, according to its fourth quarter results. So, if you own a business, you want a Facebook page. The trick is to do it right.

Here’s how to make one that will not only start some social chatter but will create new customers for your business.

Building Your Facebook Business Page

The first thing you need to do is to create your Facebook business page. While it’s not difficult to do, you should be thoughtful about how you put it together. Here are a few tips.

Make a Professional, Not Personal Profile

You don’t want to

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U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns

By Nandita Bose

(Reuters) – U.S. legislation aimed at stopping online child sexual abuse material is likely to be amended to address concerns of platforms like Google and Facebook that the proposed law goes too far to weaken privacy protections for ordinary users, according to a draft of the bill seen by Reuters.

Tech companies, currently protected from lawsuits over content posted by users, feared the original bill would hurt their ability to offer protections like end-to-end encryption. That technology scrambles messages so they can be deciphered only by the sender and intended recipient, a feature critical to the online privacy of billions of people.

In a new draft authored by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, The Eliminating Abuse and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies Act of 2019, or EARN IT Act, makes compliance with a set of controversial “best practices” voluntary instead of mandatory for companies such as

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U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns: draft

By Nandita Bose

(Reuters) – U.S. legislation aimed at stopping online child sexual abuse material is likely to be amended to address concerns of platforms like Google and Facebook that the proposed law goes too far to weaken privacy protections for ordinary users, according to a draft of the bill seen by Reuters.

Tech companies, currently protected from lawsuits over content posted by users, feared the original bill would hurt their ability to offer protections like end-to-end encryption. That technology scrambles messages so they can be deciphered only by the sender and intended recipient, a feature critical to the online privacy of billions of people.

In a new draft authored by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, The Eliminating Abuse and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies Act of 2019, or EARN IT Act, makes compliance with a set of controversial “best practices” voluntary instead of mandatory for companies such as

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Facebook Cracked Down On Extremism. It Only Took A Major Boycott And Multiple Killings.

Facebook announced on Tuesday that it had banned hundreds of accounts and dozens of groups dedicated to the far-right “boogaloo” movement, which has been linked to multiple extremist plots and killings in recent months. Facebook touted its action as “the latest step in our commitment to ban people who proclaim a violent mission from using our platform.” 

Other social media companies took similar actions against hate speech and extremism this week. Reddit announced that it banned about 2,000 of its online communities for violating its content policies, including the subreddit The_Donald, which had about 800,000 members who supported President Donald Trump.

YouTube de-platformed several far-right extremists from its service, and the streaming service Twitch temporarily suspended Trump’s account for “hateful conduct.”

But this isn’t a sea change in how these platforms address hateful content. Many experts instead see a slow, piecemeal approach by companies who have let extremism and political

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UK’s competition regulator demands tougher action on Google and Facebook

The Unit would have a “fairness-by-design” policy, too, and the power to separate platforms — Facebook and Instagram, for instance, or Google and YouTube — if it was needed to “ensure healthy competition.”

These powers would be complimented by some company-specific initiatives. The regulator believes, for instance, that Google should be forced to hand over its search data — the questions people type and the links they click on, for instance — so that rivals can improve their own search algorithms and “properly compete.” The CMA also believes that the Unit should somehow “restrict” Google’s ability to be the default search engine on many device and browsers. Facebook, meanwhile, should be ordered to “increase its interoperability with competing social media platforms,” according to the CMA. Under the Unit’s orders, Facebook would also introduce an option that lets users decide whether they want to receive personalised ads.

These sorts of powers

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Facebook Critics Target One Thing CEO Won’t Cede: Control

(Bloomberg) —

Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg took the unusual step on Friday of publicly broadcasting a weekly Q&A with employees. Over a live video feed, the CEO announced a series of updates to Facebook’s policies around hate speech — the central topic fueling a growing boycott of Facebook advertising.

But the new policies, like labeling posts from public figures who break its terms of service, didn’t assuage critics. The coalition of civil rights groups organizing the boycott called the announcement “a small number of small changes.” Demands like adding a high-ranking executive focused on civil rights, providing face-to-face customer service for hate speech victims and removing extra protections for elected leaders were still unmet.

And, though it wasn’t officially included on their public list of proposed changes, the boycott organizers also have a more fundamental complaint: Zuckerberg has too much control.

“Mark Zuckerberg has way too much

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Facebook tells users how to stop false stories in their news feed

The Facebook "like" sign is seen at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019: JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images
The Facebook “like” sign is seen at Facebook’s corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019: JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook has launched a new campaign to help people spot false stories and misinformation.

The ads will encourage people to question what they read online, in their Facebook news feeds and elsewhere, when they launch from July.

It comes as Facebook and other platforms face questions over how tightly they should regulate misleading stories, and whether they are doing enough to stop their spread.

Devised in consultation with fact-checking partner Full Fact, the ads will ask the public to check whether a post is from a trusted source, ensure they read beyond headlines, and be alert to manipulated images, as well as reflecting on how it makes them feel.

“People who make false news try to manipulate your feelings,” warns one of the messages.

“If it

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