election

Shoe Industry Leaders Launch Online Election Hub to Help Get Out the Vote

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The shoe industry wants to help get out the vote ahead of this year’s elections.

Tomorrow the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America will debut ShoeVoter.com, a non-partisan online center that provides necessary voting information to shoe professionals in the United States.

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The website will offer executives and other members of the footwear sector access to voting-related materials, including their state’s registration rules and deadlines, absentee ballot guidelines, voting locations and requirements, a list of candidates in their district and the latest in COVID-19-related information.

“Every state has different cut-off dates and rules for registering to vote, applying for absentee ballots, as well as ID requirements for in-person voting. Worse, many Board of Election websites across the country are hard to navigate and can be unclear on rules. This makes it hard for companies to clearly educate their workers

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How social media amplifies political activism and threatens election integrity

<span class="caption">President Trump's campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. had thousands of empty seats, thanks at least in part to the actions of teenagers who mobilized on the social media platform TikTok.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Election-2020-Trump/d0e10e8a467a499fbe9b81bed6414e5e/51/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Evan Vucci">AP Photo/Evan Vucci</a></span>
President Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. had thousands of empty seats, thanks at least in part to the actions of teenagers who mobilized on the social media platform TikTok. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The lower-than-expected attendance at President Trump’s rally in Tulsa on June 20 was attributed, at least in part, to an online army of K-pop fans who used the social network TikTok to organize and reserve tickets for the rally as a means of pranking the campaign.

Similarly, the historically unprecedented scale of the George Floyd protests can be attributed in part to social media. By some estimates 25 million Americans participated at protests.

Social media has proven itself as a tool for political activism, from online boycotts to offline gatherings. It also has implications for how political campaigns operate. Social media can aid campaigns with voter targeting efforts, but it can also make the electoral process vulnerable

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