Christian leaders debate how to do church amid pandemic

Christel Deskins

On a recent Sunday, Rod Loy, senior pastor at the First Assembly of God in North Little Rock, Arkansas, delivered the message of the Gospel through his computer screen.

“It’s easy to live out your faith when everything is going good,” he preached to his congregation. “But the real test is difficult. How does your faith hold up when the doctor gives you a bad report, the kids get bad grades and you can’t pay your bills? How does your faith hold up when you lose your job in the middle of a pandemic? The true test of faith is a difficulty, hardship and persecution.” 

As he spoke, members of the church typed “amen” in the comment section. The church has used Facebook to livestream its services for the past couple of months.  

Across the USA, faith leaders debate how they can continue to pray in fellowship with others while

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Online prayers. Social distancing in the pews. Christian leaders debate how to do church amid pandemic.

Christel Deskins

On a recent Sunday, Rod Loy, senior pastor at the First Assembly of God in North Little Rock, Arkansas, delivered the message of the Gospel through his computer screen.

“It’s easy to live out your faith when everything is going good,” he preached to his congregation. “But the real test is difficult. How does your faith hold up when the doctor gives you a bad report, the kids get bad grades, and you can’t pay your bills? How does your faith hold up when you lose your job in the middle of a pandemic? The true test of faith is a difficulty, hardship and persecution.” 

As he spoke, members of the church typed “amen” in the comment section. The church has been using Facebook to livestream its services for the past couple of months.  

Across the U.S., faith leaders are debating how they can continue to pray in fellowship with

Read More

Online prayers. Social distancing in the pews. Christian leaders debate how to do church amid pandemic

Christel Deskins

On a recent Sunday, Rod Loy, senior pastor at the First Assembly of God in North Little Rock, Arkansas, delivered the message of the Gospel through his computer screen.

“It’s easy to live out your faith when everything is going good,” he preached to his congregation. “But the real test is difficult. How does your faith hold up when the doctor gives you a bad report, the kids get bad grades, and you can’t pay your bills? How does your faith hold up when you lose your job in the middle of a pandemic? The true test of faith is a difficulty, hardship and persecution.” 

As he spoke, members of the church typed “amen” in the comment section. The church has been using Facebook to livestream its services for the past couple of months.  

Across the U.S., faith leaders are debating how they can continue to pray in fellowship with

Read More

As representation debate rages, Latinx creators tell Hollywood: ‘Just open the door’

Christel Deskins

TV writers Diana Mendez, left, and Judalina Neira formed the Latina TV Writers Brunch Group and La Lista to represent the Latina community in Hollywood. <span class="copyright">(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)</span>
TV writers Diana Mendez, left, and Judalina Neira formed the Latina TV Writers Brunch Group and La Lista to represent the Latina community in Hollywood. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

The outrage was instant and loud. And warranted.

No Latinx creatives appeared in any of the major categories when nominations for the 72nd Emmy Awards were announced earlier this week. How is that even possible, people raged, especially given “One Day at a Time’s” tongue-in-cheek laughs, “Vida’s” queer joy and “Los Espookys'” oddball humor?

The erasure of Latinos is not exactly news, though. Over the last five years, 82% of nominees in 19 Primetime Emmy categories were white. A mere 1% were Latino.

As the subsequent backlash to this year’s nominations reignites debate about Hollywood’s failure to represent Latinx characters on-screen, a movement toward inclusion behind the camera is taking place behind the scenes.

One morning in 2015, about

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