Here’s a List of Portable Tech Gadgets You’ll Want to Use Every Day

Electronics are getting smaller and smaller, and we all seem to have our own special must-have gadgets that we never leave home without. You undoubtedly have a smartphone with you whenever you leave the house, but that’s not to say there couldn’t be a few more conveniences. If you’re in the market for some new tech or a few cool add-ons, we’ve rounded up a large handful of palm-sized devices to add to your EDC loadout. If you know where to look, you can get affordable prices on key finders, SD cards, car USB chargers, headphones, portable speakers, and more.

Below are some of our favorite portable tech deals going right now, from a folding keyboard to a cheap smartwatch. Not only do these deals fit in your pocket, but they’re also generally cheap enough that you can fit them into your budget, as well.

Tile Mate Item Finder 4-Pack

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‘It’s a frustrating period.’ Yet LAUSD teachers muster smiles on the first day of school

Christel Deskins

Gladys Alvarez, a fifth grade teacher at Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South Los Angeles, talks to her students via Zoom during a meet-and-greet on Wednesday. <span class=(Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/UZcw4q9rf.87yX4xye8l0Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/yYCcWma7vbRNRORLdHtk.g–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/a41aef7ab645afa54a3bd1bd832aa814″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/UZcw4q9rf.87yX4xye8l0Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/yYCcWma7vbRNRORLdHtk.g–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/a41aef7ab645afa54a3bd1bd832aa814″/
Gladys Alvarez, a fifth grade teacher at Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South Los Angeles, talks to her students via Zoom during a meet-and-greet on Wednesday. (Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

It wasn’t problem free and frustrations flared through the day, but as formal instruction began Thursday in Los Angeles public schools, students, parents and teachers attempted to project a positive face on the difficult work of distance-learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Also on Thursday, L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner provided new details on how the district’s nascent COVID-19 testing and contract tracing would work. These plans became slightly more pressing when a county health official suggested that positive health trends could soon permit the potential reopening of elementary schools.

In thousands of classrooms, hundreds of thousands of tiny faces appeared on screen for online classes, provoking worry among some teachers about how they

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Like spring, Broward’s first day of school held online marred by some technical glitches

Christel Deskins

The virtual school door had problems opening Wednesday morning in Broward County.

Students were met with log-in errors, slow connectivity and crashing dashboards during the first day of the new school year, held virtually at public schools across Broward County.

The issues frustrated parents who were hoping their children would have a smoother experience than the abrupt online transition in the spring at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

At a press conference at the school district’s Fort Lauderdale headquarters, Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said an estimated 197,000 students attended online school Wednesday out of the 261,000 students enrolled in the district. There were 212,000 people on the online system simultaneously, including teachers and administrators.

He called reports of glitches on Canvas, the district’s online learning platform, “exaggerated.” He said the district does not expect the same issues to happen Thursday.

“There was a period between 8:35 and 8:50,

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Elon Musk just made $8 billion in one day. Here’s how the CEO makes and spends his $84.8 billion fortune.

Christel Deskins

Grimes revealed she was pregnant in a cryptic social media post in January, but until now, neither she nor Musk had confirmed they were having the baby together. 

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Grimes revealed she was pregnant in a cryptic social media post in January, but until now, neither she nor Musk had confirmed they were having the baby together.

The coronavirus pandemic has been an economic disaster for most Americans, but not for Elon Musk.

The Telsa CEO has made more than $48 billion between March 18 and August 13, an increase of more than 197%, according to a new analysis by left-leaning think tank the Institute for Policy Studies released Monday. That’s significantly more than any other billionaire made during the same time period.

Remarkably, Musk made his billions without ever taking a paycheck from Tesla. The CEO refuses his $56,000 minimum salary every year. In January 2018, Tesla announced it would pay Musk nothing for the next 10 years — no salary, bonuses, or stock — until the company reaches a $100 billion market

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‘Are we ready?’ LAUSD’s first day back to school, online and on Zoom, is anything but normal

Christel Deskins

Xavier Reyes, cofounder of Alta Public Schools, shows what a classroom would look like at Academia Moderna, a charter school, when the Huntington Park campus is allowed to reopen. <span class=(Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/WAXbhzIEm6xUXIu7eoZQQw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/Sz8LdC2W1c6LuvQzbJ3NgA–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/99594ae15b9f32c46a698c216d779f26″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/WAXbhzIEm6xUXIu7eoZQQw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/Sz8LdC2W1c6LuvQzbJ3NgA–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/99594ae15b9f32c46a698c216d779f26″/
Xavier Reyes, cofounder of Alta Public Schools, shows what a classroom would look like at Academia Moderna, a charter school, when the Huntington Park campus is allowed to reopen. (Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)

New back-to-school shoes, but no recess to run around. Decorative Zoom backgrounds instead of artwork newly stapled on bulletin boards. Freshly waxed floors with no students to scuff them up.

A new school year like no other begins Tuesday in Los Angeles when some 500,000 students are expected to sign on and show up at a distance — and for many, at a disadvantage — devoid of the traditional in-person joy of seeing friends and teachers.

Campuses are deserted except for a skeleton staff, but some 30,000 teachers from 1,400 schools will fire up their computers from home, virtually beckoning children to participate in

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A coronavirus loophole? Capital Christian High School opens, saying it’s day care

Christel Deskins

Students arrived at Capital Christian High School on Thursday in small doses for the first day of instruction. The scene repeated on Friday and Monday morning.

Teenagers checked in at the main entrance, had quick temperature checks and were provided masks if they did not bring one. This was an unusual sight in that this is the only high school in Northern California that has any sort of on-campus instruction.

Capital Christian has used a day care provision to make it work this far, which has impressed students and parents, but also caught the attention of the Sacramento County health chief Dr. Peter Beilenson.

He told The Sacramento Bee on Sunday that he planned to call Capital Christian, adding that If the school is violating the state and county COVID-19 rules, “We would shut them down.”

Capital Christian Head of Schools Tim Wong said Monday he had not heard from

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ANGI Homeservices, The Children’s Place, Hanesbrands, Crocs and Activision Blizzard highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

Christel Deskins

For Immediate Release

Chicago, IL – August 17, 2020 – Zacks Equity Research Shares of ANGI Homeservices Inc. ANGI as the Bull of the Day, The Children’s Place, Inc. PLCE asthe Bear of the Day. In addition, Zacks Equity Research provides analysis onHanesbrands Inc. HBI, Crocs, Inc. CROX and Activision Blizzard, Inc. ATVI.

Here is a synopsis of all five stocks:

Bull of the Day:

The world economy is shifting online with the pandemic accelerating global digitalization by 5 years in just 5 months. Angi Homeservices is well-positioned for the new normal, with its leading online service offerings unmatched in its niche space.

This enterprise “is creating the world’s largest digital marketplace for home services, connecting millions of homeowners across the globe with home service professionals.” Analysts have been increasingly optimistic about the company’s outlook pushing up EPS estimates.

The Business

Angi Homeservices was created when Angie’s List and HomeAdvisor

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U.S. Cases Slow as Deaths Pass 1,000 for Fifth Day: Virus Update

Christel Deskins

(Bloomberg) —

The U.S. added 47,813 cases, a 0.9% rise compared with the 1% increase over the previous week. Deaths exceeded 1,000 for the fifth consecutive day, while the pace of cases and deaths slowed in Florida and Arizona.

Italy told nightclubs to close, matching a similar directive by Spain on Friday. France’s public health agency warned that all of the country’s Covid-19 indicators are trending upward.

Russia agreed in principle with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to conduct clinical trials of its coronavirus vaccine, the head of its sovereign wealth fund said. China and Russia may also work together on a vaccine, a Chinese virus expert said.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Global cases approach 21.5 million; deaths pass 771,500How $50,000-a-year private schools plan for Covid: NYC ReopensFirst into the virus slump, China is proving the fastest outRussia’s new Sputnik launch raises risks in dash for Covid shotsHow

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A TODAY All Day town hall

Christel Deskins

The upcoming school year is going to look and feel different from any other. While the shifts have been necessary because of COVID, we can’t ignore how these changes will affect the mental health of children or their parents, whether kids are learning remotely or in person.

Jenna Bush Hager spoke to a panel of mental health professionals on TODAY All Day, the TODAY show’s streaming channel, for a special hour-long town hall, “Coronavirus and the Classroom,” a collaboration with Common Sense.

Related: Craig Melvin sat with experts to answer viewer questions about school safety.

Watch TODAY All Day: Get the best news, information and inspiration from TODAY, all day long.

Answering questions about children’s development and mental health were Dr. Stephanie Lee, a clinical psychologist with the Child Mind Institute, Dr. Allison Kanter Agliata, a psychologist and former head of middle school in Tampa Florida, and Tom Kerstin, a

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El Camino Real students make it through first day of online classes

Christel Deskins

El Camino Real catcher Josh Klein had his first day of online learning from home on Monday, the first day of the new semester for students at the Woodland Hills charter school. <span class="copyright">(Abby Spencer-Knerr)</span>
El Camino Real catcher Josh Klein had his first day of online learning from home on Monday, the first day of the new semester for students at the Woodland Hills charter school. (Abby Spencer-Knerr)

Monday was the first day of the school year at El Camino Real, an independent charter school in Woodland Hills.

Junior catcher Josh Klein woke up at 7:45 a.m., took a shower, got dressed, ate breakfast, and then turned on his school-supplied Lenovo laptop at 8:45 a.m. for his first day of online classes.

The first part of the day ended at 12:15 p.m. for a 30-minute lunch break, and his remaining classes ended at 2:15 p.m. Using Microsoft Team, he had classes in Spanish III, English, math, honors chemistry, baseball and advanced placement U.S. history.

“Today was getting used to classes and going over curriculum and how online distance learning is going to work,” he

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