Airlines are removing seats to make space for gadgets and seafood | Coronavirus

Cargo, one of the least glamorous aspects of flying, is proving a rare ray of light for airlines amid the coronavirus gloom.

The grounding of passenger planes at a time of increased demand for everything from medical supplies to iPhones has boosted freight rates. With much of the world’s population house-bound and shopping online instead of hitting the malls, analysts see no let-up in demand, particularly as the peak year-end holiday season approaches.

“Airfreight is going to be a bright spot for carriers at least for this year because while borders are closed that doesn’t mean people aren’t buying,” said Um Kyung-a, an airline analyst at Shinyoung Securities in Seoul, South Korea. “That trend is likely to continue as cargo capacity remains limited.”

The sort of goods moving along this global conveyor belt 30,000 feet in the sky also track the pandemic’s unfurling. Masks and gloves have given way to

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Coronavirus cases create tangled web of WPIAL football schedule changes | Trib HSSN

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Friday, September 4, 2020 | 3:53 PM


Times are changing these days because of the coronavirus. That means changing minute by minute.

Because of covid-19 issues, several schools have made adjustments to their football schedules.

Kiski Area paused football activities until Sept. 10 due to a coronavirus exposure issue. Elizabeth Forward pushed back the start of in-person instruction because of students testing positive. Both were forced to make football schedule changes.

Elizabeth Forward is now looking for a game in Week 1.

The Warriors were scheduled to meet Yough on Friday, Sept. 11, but wanted to push that date back to Monday, Sept. 14 to comply with the PIAA rule that requires teams have 15 practices before playing

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How many are hospitalized with coronavirus? Federal changes create confusion in Michigan’s daily report

Christel Deskins

It hasn’t been easy to track Michigan’s coronavirus hospitalization data this month.

First, the state coronvirus website stopped updating its hospitalization numbers between Aug. 3 and Aug. 9.

Then when the reporting resumed, it appeared the numbers had increased dramatically — from 460 coronavirus patients on Aug. 3 to 640 on Aug. 10.

There was also a change in format, making it unclear whether it was an apples-to-apples comparison.

Turns out, it wasn’t.

“The hospitalization data was changed as a result of changes in how the federal government requires us to post the data. It includes both confirmed and suspected cases data, where previously it was only confirmed,” said Lynne Sutfin, spokeswoman for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Oh.

The fact that change wasn’t explained on the website wasn’t the only problem. The new dataset made it impossible to track long-term trends, a point made publicly and

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Internet ETFs to Keep Soaring Amid Coronavirus Crisis

Christel Deskins

The coronavirus outbreak continues to aggravate in the United States as it recorded 35,112 new cases and 445 virus-related deaths on Aug 17, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The world’s largest economy has already seen more than 5.4 million coronavirus cases along with at least 170,000 fatalities. Per a CNN report, around 189,000 coronavirus deaths in the United States are currently expected by Sep 5, with a possible range of 181,375 to 201,431 deaths, according to an ensemble forecast published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The second half of 2020 is expected to keep facing the brunt of the pandemic as the second wave of the outbreak is gathering steam.In the current scenario, the rising work-from-home and online shopping trend, increasing digital payments, growing video streaming and soaring video game sales are slowly becoming the “new normal.” With the new trends making way, Internet

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Coronavirus Doctors Battle Another Scourge: Misinformation

Christel Deskins

Dr. Howard Mell, an emergency room physician, in O'Fallon, Ill., Aug. 8, 2020, who said he meets several patients a week who swear by falsehoods they found on the internet. (Jess T. Dugan/The New York Times)
Dr. Howard Mell, an emergency room physician, in O’Fallon, Ill., Aug. 8, 2020, who said he meets several patients a week who swear by falsehoods they found on the internet. (Jess T. Dugan/The New York Times)

An emergency room doctor in Illinois was accused in April of profiting from naming coronavirus as the cause of a patient’s death, a rumor spreading online.

An internist in New York treated a vomiting patient in May who drank a bleach mixture as part of a fake virus cure found on YouTube.

And in June a paramedic in Britain aided a clearly sick man who had refused to go to a hospital after reading misleading warnings about poor coronavirus treatment on social media.

Doctors on the front lines of the global pandemic say they are fighting not just the coronavirus, but also increasingly combating a never-ending scourge of misinformation about the disease that is

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8 Ways You Could Unknowingly Catch Coronavirus

Christel Deskins

With COVID-19 in the news everyday, and advice being thrown at you left and right, you may assume you’re taking all the proper precautions you can to avoid infection. But even if you’re following all the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), you may still be at risk. Consider these eight ways you could unknowingly catch the virus and make the changes necessary to ensure you stay safe—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.

close up of woman’s hand reaching to door knob, opening the door
close up of woman’s hand reaching to door knob, opening the door

Door handles are frequently touched surfaces in public places. If an infected individual grabs a door handle or pushes open a door, they may infect the surface. “Respiratory secretions or droplets expelled by infected individuals can contaminate surfaces and objects, creating fomites (contaminated surfaces),” according to

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New coronavirus cases are emerging at schools. How much you know depends on where you live

Christel Deskins

As children and teachers started returning to classrooms over the past few weeks, new cases of COVID-19 emerged, forcing some schools to temporarily shift to online-learning only and hundreds of students to quarantine at home until their health was assured.

While those developments have been well-documented, it’s what remains unknown that has been more troubling for some parents and educators.

Information that schools, health officials and state agencies share about known cases varies substantially, leaving some stakeholders to wonder how safe they or their children may be when new cases emerge. 

In Gainesville, Florida, where several staff members working at an in-person summer program contracted coronavirus, the absence of a communitywide notification protocol allowed rumors and fear to spread. Despite assurances from district officials that they will share as much information as they can about cases this fall, some parents and teachers remain skeptical that they will learn enough, soon

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UNC-Chapel Hill Pivots to Remote Learning 1 Week After Classes Start as Coronavirus Cases Soar

Christel Deskins

Ted Richardson/getty images Students returned to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has announced it will be shifting to remote learning after coronavirus cases among students soared just one week into the new school year.

The announcement came on Monday, just seven days after the university held its first week of in-person classes. Since then, 130 students have tested positive, according to CNN.

In the past week, the rate of positive COVID-19 tests rose from 2.8 percent to 13.6 percent — and as of Monday morning, almost 1,000 students have been tested, with 177 placed in isolation and an additional 349 in quarantine, according to a university statement. So far, the majority of students who have tested positive have only “demonstrated mild symptoms.”

Starting Wednesday, all undergraduate classes will be conducted remotely, and UNC-Chapel Hill will allow students to

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A coronavirus loophole? Capital Christian High School opens, saying it’s day care

Christel Deskins

Students arrived at Capital Christian High School on Thursday in small doses for the first day of instruction. The scene repeated on Friday and Monday morning.

Teenagers checked in at the main entrance, had quick temperature checks and were provided masks if they did not bring one. This was an unusual sight in that this is the only high school in Northern California that has any sort of on-campus instruction.

Capital Christian has used a day care provision to make it work this far, which has impressed students and parents, but also caught the attention of the Sacramento County health chief Dr. Peter Beilenson.

He told The Sacramento Bee on Sunday that he planned to call Capital Christian, adding that If the school is violating the state and county COVID-19 rules, “We would shut them down.”

Capital Christian Head of Schools Tim Wong said Monday he had not heard from

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Coronavirus complicates California’s worst power shortage in two decades

Christel Deskins

SANTA MONICA, CA - AUG. 15, 2020.: Beachgoers create a forest of umbrellas as thousands seek refuge in Santa Monica with temperatures reaching triple digits and beyond in inland valleys and deserts on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2020. A heatwave caused by a high pressure system over Southern California is expected to last through next week. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) <span class="copyright">(Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times)</span>
SANTA MONICA, CA – AUG. 15, 2020.: Beachgoers create a forest of umbrellas as thousands seek refuge in Santa Monica with temperatures reaching triple digits and beyond in inland valleys and deserts on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2020. A heatwave caused by a high pressure system over Southern California is expected to last through next week. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times)

A late-summer heat wave in Southern California typically sends people fleeing to movie theaters, shopping malls and crowded beaches in search of a cool respite.

But the coronavirus pandemic has forced the closure of places where people once gathered, upending those routines.

So as temperatures soared Friday, many people instead stayed at home with their air conditioners blasting. Even though many offices and businesses were closed due to the pandemic, that intense demand — along with other factors including a dearth of power coming in

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