Coronavirus cases create tangled web of WPIAL football schedule changes | Trib HSSN

Christel Deskins

By:


Friday, September 4, 2020 | 3:53 PM


Times are changing these days because of the coronavirus. That means changing minute by minute.

Because of covid-19 issues, several schools have made adjustments to their football schedules.

Kiski Area paused football activities until Sept. 10 due to a coronavirus exposure issue. Elizabeth Forward pushed back the start of in-person instruction because of students testing positive. Both were forced to make football schedule changes.

Elizabeth Forward is now looking for a game in Week 1.

The Warriors were scheduled to meet Yough on Friday, Sept. 11, but wanted to push that date back to Monday, Sept. 14 to comply with the PIAA rule that requires teams have 15 practices before playing

Read More

Hillsborough teachers create website to track COVID-19 cases

Christel Deskins

The group will make a custom-made coronavirus dashboard with data verified by the school district.

TAMPA, Fla. — With the school year just days away for those in Hillsborough County, teachers and parents are monitoring coronavirus data in the county. 

“This is a deadly virus, and people have to be responsible for their safety,” Blake High School teacher Steve Kemp said.

Knowing the risks that come with going back into the classroom, Steve Kemp is spearheading a group of teachers who are tracking the number of positive COVID-19 cases in the Hillsborough County School District. 

“The purpose of it is to provide information that is just not readily available,” Kemp said.

The high school teacher says the school district has not published any coronavirus data. That’s why this Facebook page will soon link to a custom made coronavirus dashboard that will detail how many students, teachers and staff have tested

Read More

623 virus cases linked to South Korea church

Christel Deskins

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean health workers have found more than 600 coronavirus infections linked to a Seoul church led by a vocal opponent of the country’s president as officials began restricting gatherings in the greater capital area amid fears that transmissions are getting out of control.

Vice Health Minister Kim Gang-lip said Wednesday that health authorities are also seeking location data provided by cellphone carriers while trying to track thousands who participated in an anti-government protest on Saturday, which worsened the virus’s spread. The march was attended by members of the Sarang Jeil Church and its ultra-right pastor, Jun Kwang-hun, who has been hospitalized since Monday after testing positive.

Kwon Jun-wook, director of South Korea’s National Health Institute, said 623 cases have been linked to church members after the completion of some 3,000 tests. Police are pursuing around 600 church members who remain

Read More

Notre Dame pauses in-person classes; Chicago’s Navy Pier to close early; Mississippi reports cases in 71 counties

Christel Deskins

The World Health Organization is dashing hopes of those who think enough people around the globe are being infected by the coronavirus to create “herd immunity,” which could stop the spread.

A researcher says we’re still a long ways off from that point in which enough people have antibodies from the virus that it can halt the spread before vaccines become available, the Daily Mail reported. The big problem at the moment is younger persons, those in the 20s, 30s or 40s, with mild or no symptoms of COVID-19 who are unknowingly spreading it.

Another way to slow the spread: wear masks in public restrooms. Flushing a urinal can create an “alarming upward flow” of particles, which are present in human feces and urine, according to a new study.

The government’s response to the coronavirus, meanwhile, remains a political football. A woman whose father died from the coronavirus blamed President

Read More

Texas Cases Up; Notre Dame Halts In-Person Classes: Virus Update

Christel Deskins

(Bloomberg) — The coronavirus outbreaks in Florida and California showed signs of easing. U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated that Democrats might cut their economic stimulus proposal to seal a deal for a Covid-19 relief package.

Finland’s prime minister is being tested for coronavirus, while Germany’s chancellor ruled out any further easing of restrictions after a recent surge in cases. The U.K., Europe’s hardest-hit country, reported the lowest tally of deaths in 20 weeks. The World Health Organization warned against vaccine nationalism.

Hong Kong’s government will roll out a third round of anti-epidemic measures, Chief Executive Carrie Lam said. A flareup in South Korea continued to grow, with 246 more cases reported Tuesday, and the country banned large gatherings in and around Seoul.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Global cases top 21.8 million; deaths pass 774,000Mystery grows over whether virus spreads through food packagingUNC calling off in-person school seen ‘clear as

Read More

Postmaster General to delay USPS changes; cases surge in South Korea; urinals may shoot ‘plumes’ of particles

Christel Deskins

The World Health Organization is dashing hopes of those who think enough people around the globe are being infected by the coronavirus to create “herd immunity,” which could stop the spread.

A researcher says we’re still a long ways off from that point in which enough people have antibodies from the virus that it can halt the spread before vaccines become available, the Daily Mail reported. The big problem at the moment is younger persons, those in the 20s, 30s or 40s, with mild or no symptoms of COVID-19 who are unknowingly spreading it.

Another way to slow the spread: wear masks in public restrooms. Flushing a urinal can create an “alarming upward flow” of particles, which are present in human feces and urine, according to a new study.

The government’s response to the coronavirus, meanwhile, remains a political football. A woman whose father died from the coronavirus blamed President

Read More

New coronavirus cases are emerging at schools. How much you know depends on where you live

Christel Deskins

As children and teachers started returning to classrooms over the past few weeks, new cases of COVID-19 emerged, forcing some schools to temporarily shift to online-learning only and hundreds of students to quarantine at home until their health was assured.

While those developments have been well-documented, it’s what remains unknown that has been more troubling for some parents and educators.

Information that schools, health officials and state agencies share about known cases varies substantially, leaving some stakeholders to wonder how safe they or their children may be when new cases emerge. 

In Gainesville, Florida, where several staff members working at an in-person summer program contracted coronavirus, the absence of a communitywide notification protocol allowed rumors and fear to spread. Despite assurances from district officials that they will share as much information as they can about cases this fall, some parents and teachers remain skeptical that they will learn enough, soon

Read More

UNC-Chapel Hill Pivots to Remote Learning 1 Week After Classes Start as Coronavirus Cases Soar

Christel Deskins

Ted Richardson/getty images Students returned to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has announced it will be shifting to remote learning after coronavirus cases among students soared just one week into the new school year.

The announcement came on Monday, just seven days after the university held its first week of in-person classes. Since then, 130 students have tested positive, according to CNN.

In the past week, the rate of positive COVID-19 tests rose from 2.8 percent to 13.6 percent — and as of Monday morning, almost 1,000 students have been tested, with 177 placed in isolation and an additional 349 in quarantine, according to a university statement. So far, the majority of students who have tested positive have only “demonstrated mild symptoms.”

Starting Wednesday, all undergraduate classes will be conducted remotely, and UNC-Chapel Hill will allow students to

Read More

U.S. Cases Slow as Deaths Pass 1,000 for Fifth Day: Virus Update

Christel Deskins

(Bloomberg) —

The U.S. added 47,813 cases, a 0.9% rise compared with the 1% increase over the previous week. Deaths exceeded 1,000 for the fifth consecutive day, while the pace of cases and deaths slowed in Florida and Arizona.

Italy told nightclubs to close, matching a similar directive by Spain on Friday. France’s public health agency warned that all of the country’s Covid-19 indicators are trending upward.

Russia agreed in principle with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to conduct clinical trials of its coronavirus vaccine, the head of its sovereign wealth fund said. China and Russia may also work together on a vaccine, a Chinese virus expert said.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Global cases approach 21.5 million; deaths pass 771,500How $50,000-a-year private schools plan for Covid: NYC ReopensFirst into the virus slump, China is proving the fastest outRussia’s new Sputnik launch raises risks in dash for Covid shotsHow

Read More

California becomes first state to surpass 600,000 COVID-19 cases

Christel Deskins

California has become the first state in the U.S. to surpass 600,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19. The harrowing milestone comes as the state tops 11,000 total deaths from the virus. 

Johns Hopkins University reported 603,072 coronavirus cases in the Golden State on Friday morning. The state leads the nation in cases, followed by Florida, with 557,137 cases, and Texas, with 531,428 cases. 

The state is averaging 137,000 tests per day, with a positivity rate of 6.2% over the last 14-day period, Governor Gavin Newsom said Friday. 

With 11,005 reported fatalities, California now ranks third in the country, behind New York and New Jersey, for the highest death toll. The state has experienced an increase in the number of deaths of about 10% in just one week. Texas and Florida rank fourth and fifth, respectively, for the highest number of deaths in the nation. 

As of Friday, the U.S. has

Read More