Future mental health care may include diagnosis via brain scan and computer algorithm

Christel Deskins

IMAGE

IMAGE: MRI images like this one were screened by a machine learning computer algorithm designed by a research team at the University of Tokyo. The algorithm learned to identify the brains…
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Credit: Image by Shinsuke Koike, CC-BY

Most of modern medicine has physical tests or objective techniques to define much of what ails us. Yet, there is currently no blood or genetic test, or impartial procedure that can definitively diagnose a mental illness, and certainly none to distinguish between different psychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. Experts at the University of Tokyo are combining machine learning with brain imaging tools to redefine the standard for diagnosing mental illnesses.

“Psychiatrists, including me, often talk about symptoms and behaviors with patients and their teachers, friends and parents. We only meet patients in the hospital or clinic, not out in their daily lives. We have to make medical conclusions using subjective, secondhand

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How IoT revolutionized medical care during the pandemic

Christel Deskins

Over the last few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the world into an unprecedented situation. It even gave birth to new concepts such as social-distancing and prioritized technologies like cloud, internet of things (IoT) services, and artificial intelligence. Likewise, IoT and the internet of medical things (IoMT) have witnessed a number of innovative revolutions to address the coronavirus crisis. These technologies in healthcare and retail may have a long-lasting impact in the upcoming future.

IoT has predominantly become one of the frequent expressions across the technological domain nowadays, with the potential to significantly enhance the way we interact with the contemporary world. From high-level healthcare devices to common household gadgets, IoT technology is getting more intelligent and connected to the internet, facilitating seamless communication between networks and devices.

Why medical connectivity matters?

The coronavirus outbreak has led IoT healthcare companies to promptly provide solutions for combatting the increasing

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A coronavirus loophole? Capital Christian High School opens, saying it’s day care

Christel Deskins

Students arrived at Capital Christian High School on Thursday in small doses for the first day of instruction. The scene repeated on Friday and Monday morning.

Teenagers checked in at the main entrance, had quick temperature checks and were provided masks if they did not bring one. This was an unusual sight in that this is the only high school in Northern California that has any sort of on-campus instruction.

Capital Christian has used a day care provision to make it work this far, which has impressed students and parents, but also caught the attention of the Sacramento County health chief Dr. Peter Beilenson.

He told The Sacramento Bee on Sunday that he planned to call Capital Christian, adding that If the school is violating the state and county COVID-19 rules, “We would shut them down.”

Capital Christian Head of Schools Tim Wong said Monday he had not heard from

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Indonesia president urges economic ‘reboot’, boost to health care

Christel Deskins

By Gayatri Suroyo and Tabita Diela

JAKARTA (Reuters) – Indonesia must use the coronavirus pandemic to reboot Southeast Asia’s biggest economy, President Joko Widodo said on Friday, as he proposed a $187 billion 2021 budget that includes spending more on healthcare, including vaccines, and infrastructure.

Widodo made the remarks in his annual state of the union and budget speeches to parliament. Due to coronavirus precautions, less than half of the lawmakers were present for his address, with the rest watching online.

Likening the current economic situation to “a computer crash”, he said Indonesia, along with other countries, must “shutdown, restart and reboot”.

“We must capitalize on the crisis as a momentum to make a big leap,” he said.

Widodo proposed a 2,747.5 trillion rupiah ($186.65 billion) 2021 budget, up 0.3% from this year.

He said the fiscal deficit should dip to 5.5% of GDP, from 6.34% in 2020, the highest

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Teens Found Nonprofit To Make Coronavirus Care Packages

Christel Deskins

CALIFORNIA — When Sky Yang founded nonprofit Break the Outbreak in March, he had a website and a vision of outfitting essential workers with protective gear.

“Our operations were small at the time, and we had to finance them on our own,” said Yang, a rising senior at Dublin High School in the Bay Area, in an email interview. “Initially, we faced rejections from many restaurants. But we persevered.”

Months later, Break the Outbreak is in the process of expanding to 28 chapters across 14 states, with more than 200 members in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles and elsewhere, organizers said. Members have created and donated more than 2,000 masks to food industry workers stocking shelves and serving up meals.

Break the Outbreak has a strong Bay Area presence, but has expanded in California and across the country, in cities such as New York City and Salt Lake City. The nonprofit’s

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Bay Area Teens Found Nonprofit, Make Coronavirus Care Packages

Christel Deskins

BAY AREA, CA — When Sky Yang founded nonprofit Break the Outbreak in March, he had a website and a vision of outfitting essential workers with protective gear.

“Our operations were small at the time, and we had to finance them on our own,” said Yang, a rising Dublin High School senior, in an email interview. “Initially, we faced rejections from many restaurants. But we persevered.”

Months later, Break the Outbreak is in the process of expanding to 28 chapters across 14 states, with more than 200 members in San Jose and elsewhere, organizers said. Members have created and donated more than 2,000 masks to food industry workers stocking shelves and serving up meals.

Break the Outbreak has a strong East Bay presence, but has expanded to cities such as Los Angeles, New York City and Salt Lake City. The nonprofit’s first donation was to Rigatoni’s in Dublin.

“Though we

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With remote back-to-school, child care challenges for providers, families emerge

Christel Deskins

Student Masks.
Student Masks.

CINCINNATI, Ohio — As school officials chalk up plans for students to learn off-site, in schools or both this fall, child care providers across the country are working to create more safe spaces and care scenarios for kids. 

And they’re doing it under pressure.

School plans are iffy, so solutions must be fluid. Care centers are already working with their own coronavirus pandemic guidelines for young children, often with crippling costs. 

“We are in the midst of a tornado, and we’re trying to figure out how to educate in the middle of it. The tornado is COVID-19. It is not letting up,” said Jorge Perez, president and CEO of YMCA of Greater Cincinnati.

“The systems are in flux. We are going to have to be speedy. We are going to need additional funding.”

That need was expressed nationwide among child care providers who took part in a survey

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Coronavirus child care pinch in U.S. poses threat to economic gains of working women

Christel Deskins

By Jonnelle Marte and Rachel Dissell

CLEVELAND (Reuters) – Most days, Zora Pannell works from her dining room table, sitting in front of her computer, turning off the video on Zoom calls to nurse her one-year-old daughter, Savannah.

Pannell has balanced working from home and caring for her daughter and son Timothy, aged 2, since March when she started a new job as a manager for a language services company the same week that Ohio issued a “stay at home” order to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Working from home is an exhausting daily juggle but she’s more worried about being told it’s time to return to the office. Her husband cannot watch the children during the day because he has a job at a local steel mill and the couple have been unable to find a daycare center they deemed safe and affordable close to their Shaker Heights

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