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Macy’s Black Friday in July

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Slashing prices on homeware, kitchen items, clothing and beauty products, Macy’s is hosting a Black Friday in July sale with huge discounts that match those you would normally see around Thanksgiving. Brands like KitchenAid, Tommy Hilfiger and Martha Stewart Collection are participating, giving shoppers the opportunity to purchase thousands of high quality products at low prices. The sale is active through July 13.

While Macy’s typically holds a clearance event towards the end of the summer, Michael Bonebright, consumer analyst for DealNews.com, said this year’s sale is earlier and filled with “unusually good” discounts. He attributes the sale to Macy’s need to get rid

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Elite Wine Instructor Told Black Student: Call me “Master”

Multiple members of America’s most elite group of wine professionals are renouncing their coveted “master sommelier” titles amidst allegations of racial intolerance and lack of diversity in their organization.

“If you’re complicit with the way it’s always been, then you’re racist, too, in one way or another, you know,” said Richard Betts, a wine manufacturer who resigned from the Court of Master Sommeliers after 17 years of membership.

The title Betts gave up has for years been known as the most elite designation in the American wine and beverage service industry. Master sommeliers drew a cult-like following after the release of the “Somm” documentaries, which tracked the difficult journey for those who aspired to the height of the profession. There are only 269 professionals worldwide who have ever received the title of master sommelier, according to the website for the Court of Master Sommeliers Americas, the nonprofit that administers and

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Black, female entrepreneurs are changing Silicon Valley

SAN FRANCISCO – In the early days of Zume Pizza, visitors to Julia Collins’ robotic food prep company in Silicon Valley would greet her at the door and say, “Can you grab me a water? I’m here to meet with the founder.” When pitching her business to investment partners at venture capital firms, Collins was nearly always the only woman and always the only black person in the room.

Then, late last year, a hairline crack surfaced in the invisible yet seemingly impenetrable barrier that limits black women’s access to the tech world. A $375 million investment gave Zume Pizza a valuation of $2.25 billion.

It wasn’t just the company she co-founded that reached unicorn status. Collins did, too, as the first black woman whose tech company is valued at $1 billion or more by investors. Now that she’s working on a new startup in regenerative agriculture, investors are calling

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Inside historic black bookstores’ fight for survival against the COVID-19 pandemic

OAKLAND, Calif. – Inside Marcus Books, the nation’s oldest black-owned bookstore, no one lingers anymore over shelves lined with a diasporic collection of African and African American history, culture, music and literature.

Staffers take phone orders from the safety of their homes. Shoppers keep their distance when darting in and out to pick up purchases. Blanche Richardson, whose parents founded Marcus Books 60 years ago, works alone in the store, putting on a protective mask for curbside deliveries.

Operating in a state of emergency is nothing new for independent black-owned bookstores, which for decades have survived on the margins of the publishing industry. But COVID-19 is posing a new kind of existential threat, Richardson says. Most bookstores have seen a drop in overall book sales even as online sales pick up.

“The pandemic exacerbated the plight of the few remaining black bookstores across the country,” Richardson told USA TODAY.

Black

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Stop hate speech and harassment of Black users

T’Nae Parker, a Black activist who’s been on Facebook since college, almost always has the app open on her phone, spending hours each day helping her community in South Carolina – that is, unless Facebook cuts off her access.

By her count, Parker has had her posts removed and her account locked in a punishment commonly referred to as “Facebook jail” 27 times for speaking out against racism or the complicity of white people in anti-Blackness.

“Shutting us out is basically saying ‘Shut up,’” Parker, 36, says.

Now, a Facebook advertising boycott is giving voice to years of complaints that the social media giant disproportionately stifles Black users while failing to protect them from harassment.

Launched by civil rights groups three weeks ago, the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, which has a broader aim of curbing hate speech, white supremacy and misinformation on Facebook, has struck a national nerve. Hundreds

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Terry Crews Panned Online For His Cautionary Tweet On Black Lives Matter

Terry Crews again faced heated criticism on Tuesday over a tweet about the possible direction of the Black Lives Matter movement.

“If you are a child of God, you are my brother and sister. I have family of every race, creed and ideology,” the actor tweeted. “We must ensure #blacklivesmatter doesn’t morph into #blacklivesbetter.”

His comment ― like one he made earlier this month voicing concerns about “Black supremacy” ― drew swift and harsh backlash.

It prompted Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., to respond, “We’re so far from that bridge, Terry.”

She explained in her tweet:

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