Technology

Pandemic revs up race for U.S. online car sales

By Nick Carey

DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) – After years of being part of a future that never quite arrived, the coronavirus pandemic has put U.S. online car sellers on the map.

Now comes a race to spend vast sums on digital commerce platforms specifically designed to handle auto sales. Without deep pockets, many startups and others trying to join the online game will likely be left in the dust.

“The big three (auto) e-commerce players will grow substantially, but it will be hard to be a new entrant,” said Toby Russell, joint chief executive officer of Shift, which will go public to join rival Carvana <CVNA.N> and Vroom <VRM.O> later this quarter.

“The pay to play on this thing is in the hundreds of millions and the early journey is hard, especially building out the technology,” Russell said.

Online sales still only account for around 1% of the roughly

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High-Paying Jobs You Didn’t Know Existed

Everyone knows what a doctor or chiropractor does, but have you ever heard of an ayurveda healer or a hippotherapist? If you’re scratching your head, there’s a reason. They aren’t common, but these jobs are real and can pay quite well.

Last updated: Aug. 15, 2019

Feng Shui Consultant

Estimated pay: $20,000 to $250,000

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese practice that combines philosophy, science and art. If you have a strong energy and want to help others find balance, consider this career.

Feng shui consultants visit clients’ homes and offices to bring harmony and organization to the spaces by identifying ways to arrange belongings according to feng shui traditions.

Many online certification programs provide a path to this career. Those who charge a higher hourly rate and work with wealthy clients and celebrities have the highest earning potential — in the six figures.

Read: 20 Jobs That Pay

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Grifters Are Using Targeted Snapchat Ads To Scam Teenage Trump Supporters

. (Photo: Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/HuffPost; Photos: Snapchat)
. (Photo: Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/HuffPost; Photos: Snapchat)

An attention-grabbing Snapchat ad features a cartoon version of President Donald Trump dancing through fireworks and a cascade of dollar bills to the tune of “Hail to the Chief.” Bold text against a flashing red, white and blue background promises a “FREE Trump 2020 Bundle” of MAGA-themed merchandise and even $10 in hard cash — all for a fee of just 69 cents to cover shipping. 

The offer is targeted to male youths who live in red states, watch political news and enjoy online shopping, according to Snapchat data. It could be hard to resist for many of the app’s overwhelmingly young users.

“Please support President Trump & Traditional American values by claiming Your FREE Trump 2020 Bundle before this weeks [sic] 33,500 units are gone,” says the text on the ad’s landing page. A checkout button is labeled, “YES, I SUPPORT

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Do lawmakers understand Google and Facebook enough to regulate them?

Many of us have had the feeling that technology, which continues to change at an ever-dizzying pace, may be leaving us behind. That was embodied this past week during a Congressional hearing, nominally convened to investigate antitrust concerns of four big tech titans: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

While the five-and-a-half-hour inquiry touched on a range topics from pesky spam filters and search results to how companies approached acquisitions, the House Judiciary subcommittee hearing laid one thing bare: A sizable disconnect appears to exist between the technology Americans are using and depending on in their daily lives and the knowledge base of people with the power and responsibility to decide its future and regulation.

“Consumers and investors walk away feeling like a lot of these lawmakers don’t really understand the business models to an extent that they could then navigate them and put laws in place that will dictate the

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7 Penny Stocks for the Valiant Investor

Penny stocks are notoriously risky investments because they’re often speculative in nature. With that said, investors who are willing to take on a relatively high level of risk could find them to be a good way to play the current market uncertainty. With the novel coronavirus still looming and equity prices climbing ever higher, looking for penny stocks to buy could be a good way to find value.

Laura Gonzalez, Ph.D, an Associate Professor of Finance at California State University, Long Beach, said penny stocks deliver the most value when they’re more-or-less undiscovered. As trading volume increases, the wider market starts to pay attention. 

Historical data shows that penny stocks receive less attention from investors, are oftentimes undervalued and underpriced, and therefore poised to deliver superior returns. When superior returns materialize, analysts and other investors notice them, but [the] attention is not sustained for a long time.

InvestorPlace – Stock

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The Best Face Masks for Running, Cycling and Working Out

While some cities have started reopening shops and restaurants, the majority of the country is still observing quarantine procedures that were put in place to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. One such measure that’s still in place is the wearing of face masks when out in public, with the CDC recommending cloth face coverings to help prevent the transmission of germs and viruses.

But while cloth face masks can keep you shielded on a walk, or quick trip to the grocery store, not all of these masks are designed for physical activity. Generic cloth masks aren’t always breathable, and worse, they can irritate or chaff the skin. They’re often heavy and saggy, and can fall off if not secured tightly, defeating the whole point of wearing a mask in the first place.

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Luckily, a number of manufacturers are now designing face masks specifically for

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Tesla has a huge lead over other automakers. See how the electric-car company’s brand became so mighty.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has built Tesla into one the most powerful brands in the world.
Tesla CEO Elon Musk has built Tesla into one the most powerful brands in the world.

Jae C. Hong/Associated Press

In the car business, it’s often said that brands are grand, but products pay the bills. In other words, you can capture or retain customers with what your company stands for, but long-term, if you don’t have great vehicles, you’re going to have a problem.

For almost its entire history, more than 15 years, Tesla has inverted that wisdom. A few years ago, the carmaker was barely selling any vehicles relative to its global competitors. Last year, Tesla delivered only about 250,000 vehicles, while General Motors sold almost 8 million.

Investors have decided that this means Tesla should be worth $300 billion in market capitalization, more valuable than GM, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles combined — and topping Volkswagen and Toyota, the two biggest automakers on Earth.

Vehicle sales obviously

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How China’s Ant is evolving from a payments app into a technology champion

This is the second in a series of four articles analysing the Hong Kong and mainland stock markets, delving into the reforms, emergence of the Star Market as a solid fundraising venue, upcoming technology champions and the way forward. You can read part one here.

When Starbucks was looking to boost its digital traffic in China to help sales recover from store closures prompted by the coronavirus pandemic, it turned to Alipay.

The Chinese mobile app with 900 million users scattered across the nation integrated a pre-order and pickup feature for Starbucks into its popular app last month, a service that was previously only available on Starbucks’ own mainland mobile app. The Seattle-headquartered chain of coffeehouses said on July 28 that it sees its China sales substantially recovering by the end of September, boosted by such digital initiatives.

Ant Group, the operator of Alipay, is preparing an initial public offering … Read More

How Big Tech Surged in the Coronavirus Era

The U.S. economy’s free fall may be nauseating for some sectors, but for the four tech giants that posted earnings results on Thursday, the past three months have been more like a thrill ride.

The day after taking tough questions from the House Judiciary Committee on whether they’ve become too powerful, chief executive officers from Google-parent Alphabet, Amazon, Apple and Facebook revealed that their influence is only growing.

These captains of tech industry posted a collective $28 billion in profits and added $214 billion in market value, a gobsmacking set of figures even in the best of times. But it stands out against a doom-filled backdrop of a U.S. economy that shrank 33 percent, while fears stretch worldwide across other businesses — from Main Street mom-and-pops to the arbiters of global luxury — that are dancing on the knife’s edge of real or potential extinction.

That may be stunning, but

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Stocks rise, Nasdaq outperforms as strong earnings offset economic fears

Stocks extended gains Friday morning, with the Nasdaq jumping about 1%, after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms. Each of Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Netflix hit record highs shortly after market open.

Tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates Thursday evening, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling 8% over last year, though Alphabet’s overall top- and bottom-line results still topped estimates. Facebook’s daily active users jumped 13% to 1.79 billion and monthly active users rose 12% to 2.7% billion as the

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