Technology

Republicans haven’t tried to make voting safer or easier. What does that tell you?

An election observer cleans voting booths during the Democratic presidential primary election in Kenosha, Wis., on April 7. <span class="copyright">(AFP / Getty Images)</span>
An election observer cleans voting booths during the Democratic presidential primary election in Kenosha, Wis., on April 7. (AFP / Getty Images)

To the editor: As the L.A. Times reports, months ago the House approved $3.6 billion in aid to help states deal with the expected flood of mail-in ballots. That aid has stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate. (“Trump can’t postpone the election, but officials worry he and the GOP could starve it,” July 31)

Associate dean at Loyola Law School Justin Levitt states that considering the trillions Congress is spending to shore up the economy, it is “bewildering” that the Senate is balking at approving the money needed to keep our elections functional.

Bewildering? Not when you acknowledge that the president and the Republican Party are doing everything they can to suppress mail-in ballots, fail to fund the U.S. Postal Service and generally make the most cherished right we

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Edited Transcript of CHGG.N earnings conference call or presentation 3-Aug-20 8:30pm GMT

Santa Clara Aug 4, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of Chegg Inc earnings conference call or presentation Monday, August 3, 2020 at 8:30:00pm GMT

* Andrew J. Brown

Chegg, Inc. – CFO

Chegg, Inc. – Co-Chairman, CEO & President

Chegg, Inc. – VP of IR

Joh. Berenberg, Gossler & Co. KG, Research Division – Analyst

Lake Street Capital Markets, LLC, Research Division – Head of Research & Senior Research Analyst

Northland Capital Markets, Research Division – Senior Research Analyst & Head of Equity Research

Greetings and welcome to Chegg, Inc. Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call. (Operator Instructions) As a reminder, this conference is being recorded.

It is now my pleasure to introduce your host, Tracey Ford, Vice President of Investor Relations for Chegg. Thank you. You may begin.

Tracey Ford, Chegg, Inc. – VP of IR [2]

Good afternoon. Thank you for joining Chegg’s Second Quarter 2020 Conference … Read More

News from around our 50 states

Alabama

Montgomery: A program to aid families with students who are limited to distance learning this fall because of the coronavirus pandemic will provide $100 million for increased internet service, according to the state. Vouchers, which will help pay for the cost of equipment and high-speed internet service through Dec. 31, will be available for students who receive free or reduced-price meals or meet other income criteria, Gov. Kay Ivey’s office said in a statement. Eligible families will receive a letter in August. With high-speed internet service often unavailable across rural Alabama and in some urban areas, the funding will go toward technology including wireless hot spots and home and mobile internet service, the announcement said. While some students were able to attend classes online after schools closed in the spring, many were unable to participate in similar programs because of the lack of reliable high-speed internet.

Alaska

Anchorage: Health

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How pandemic pods and zutors are changing homeschooling

When the number of coronavirus cases began to rise in the San Francisco area in early July, mother of one Lian Chikako Chang started a Facebook group to support local families and teachers who were suddenly facing the prospect of schools not opening in person as planned in mid-August.

The “Pandemic Pods” group, which aims to help with childcare and schooling needs, grew to more than 30,000 members within three weeks, as areas across the US were hit by Covid-19 spikes and more schools decided to stay shut.

“Families were left scrabbling for solutions,” says Ms Chang. “Most parents have to work, and most jobs are not compatible with homeschooling”.

And it’s not just Facebook parents are turning to. Matchmaking apps and websites have sprung up offering to help parents connect with other families to form “safe” learning pods, or match them with teachers who can give online lessons, dubbed

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Take Back the Economy From Economists

When I answer the phone, Zephyr Teachout quickly explains our call might be shorter than planned. Both she and I are at the whim of her two-year-old toddler, who is sleeping and could wake at any time.

Teachout, a law professor at Fordham University in New York, is best known for her runs for governor of the state and for Congress from New York’s 19th district (both races she lost). She has also written numerous books, including her latest, “BREAK ‘EM UP: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money.” Our discussion comes the day after historic Big Tech antitrust hearings in Congress. 

Teachout sees the antitrust discussion as a flashpoint for understanding how democracy and corruption collide. To her, concentrations of private power, as with the Big Tech companies, can’t be fixed with, say, campaign finance reform. These companies are a threat to the public sphere

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Engineered decoys trap virus in test tube study; healthcare workers at high risk even with protections

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Open https://graphics.reuters.com/HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/yxmvjqywprz/index.html in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

Engineered decoys trap virus before it can enter cells

The new coronavirus enters cells by attaching to a protein on the cell membrane called the ACE2 receptor. Scientists have now developed a decoy version of ACE2 that lures the virus and traps it, preventing it from infecting human lung cells in test tubes. “We have engineered our ACE2 Trap to bind 100 to 1,000 times tighter to the virus than normal ACE2 that is on victim cells. This provides even more potent blockage that is comparable to neutralizing antibodies,” Dr. James Wells of the University of California

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Tom Brady Has An iPhone 6 Plus And That Has Fans In Shock

Tom Brady won’t be heading to the Hall of Fame for his choice in smartphones.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback posted a photo from his car dashboard display on Saturday showing the steamy 99-degree temperature. But the car monitor’s connection to “Tom Brady’s iPhone 6+” earned a collective online gasp that the NFL superstar would still be using a six-year-old phone.

Brady signed a $50 million contract with his new team after leaving the New England Patriots, so he can probably afford the latest and greatest of technology.

But ya gotta hand it to the six-time Super Bowl champ for staying with the tried and true. Or you can make jokes about it, as many people did on Twitter.

Brady turns 43 today. Maybe somebody will get him an upgrade for a gift. 

Update: Brady later joked about his low-key gadgetry Monday morning. See his tweet far below.

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How Planet Fitness, Ulta Beauty, And Kohl’s Changed Their Business Models To Successfully Whether The Storm Of The Coronavirus and Surge Forward Towards Profitability.

“If you want to succeed in retail, you need to fully commit to off-price or online,” -Jim Cramer, Mad Money, March 5, 2020

Retailers have been struggling for sometime to compete with the giant Big-box stores such as Amazon (AMZN), Walmart (WMT), Home Depot (HD), and Costco (COST), who offer massive discounts, great selection, and an easy shopping experience. Then the Coronavirus pandemic engulfed America this past March, and most retailers, other than essential ones like pharmacies and grocery stores, were forced to close their doors because consumers were self quarantined. After that took place, retailers needed to make changes to their stores to allow for proper social distancing and hygiene so they could open them safely. Brand loyalty gave way to buying whatever was cheapest. Some retailers, including JC Penney, Neiman Marcus and Brooks Brothers have already succumbed to the virus and have filed for bankruptcy. Others have laid

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3 ways to promote social skills in homebound kids

<span class="caption">Too much time screen time can lead to lower self-esteem.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/teen-boy-plays-game-on-digital-tablet-at-home-royalty-free-image/1146552988" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images">SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images</a></span>
Too much time screen time can lead to lower self-esteem. SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images

With the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic getting worse in most of the country, a growing number of school districts from San Francisco to Atlanta have determined that a return to daily in-person instruction isn’t yet safe or viable. They aim to to stick with remote learning as the school year gets underway.

Based on my research about the psychological effects of digital technology, I’ve seen that when children and teens spend a great deal of time isolated at home and gazing at screens their social skills and self-esteem can suffer and they may become lonelier. Fortunately, there are ways to lower those risks while young people spend way more time than usual at home.

Teenage boy sits in chair playing a video game on a big flat screen.
Teenage boy sits in chair playing a video game on a big flat screen.

1. Practice paying attention to other

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Dissatisfaction With Online Retailers Runs Deep

Spurred by COVID-19, consumers are buying like crazy online, generating double-digit online sales gains at many retailers and brands through spring and summer.

But that doesn’t mean consumers are loving the digital experience. The more time and money spent online, the more they lose patience with the level of service provided by digital marketers, encounter problems and become less loyal to any one brand.

More from WWD

That’s a key finding from research released today by the Wharton School’s Baker Retailing Center and WisePlum, a customer experience insights platform that helps managers determine where to invest in the customer experience to increase sales.

As Paula Courtney, chief executive officer of WisePlum, said, “Consumers are less forgiving and needing more from retailers during the global pandemic.”

According to Thomas S. Robertson, Joshua J. Harris professor and professor of marketing at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, “We are seeing brands looking

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