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Female gamers are on the rise in the ‘world capital of gaming’

The number of females playing video games in Asia is growing at a faster rate than their male rivals, according to the latest research.

Women are levelling the playing field across all of Asia’s key markets including China, India and Japan.

The female video gaming community grew by 19% last year, according to data commissioned by Google.

Asia is regarded as the global capital of video games, accounting for 48% of the world’s total gaming revenue.

“Among the millions of female gamers joining the ranks every year, females have been a huge catalyst for growth,” said Rohini Bhushan, at Google Asia Pacific.

There are a number of factors that are contributing to this rise, with storylines becoming more inclusive and connectivity improving across the region.

For 2019, the numbers of female gamers had grown to 38% of the 1.33bn global gaming population, according to Google which collaborated with market researchers

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2 biggest California districts say school will start online

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Los Angeles and San Diego school districts, the two largest in California with a combined K-12 student population of about 720,000, announced Monday they won’t bring students back to classrooms next month because of rising coronavirus hospitalizations and infection rates.

School leaders said there is too much uncertainty surrounding the safety of students and staff to try to return pupils to classrooms right away so they will continue the distance learning that was employed for the final months of the spring semester.

“There’s a public health imperative to keep schools from becoming a petri dish,” said Austin Beutner, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District — the second-largest public school district in the country. “The health and safety of all in the school community is not something we can compromise.”

In a letter to parents, Cindy Marten, superintendent of the San Diego Unified School

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Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You for Being a Mom? Here’s What to Do

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We don’t have to remind you that it’s been a rough four months for working parents. According to a recent survey from Udemy, 90 percent of working moms feel that childcare and homeschooling are keeping them from doing their jobs, and 78 percent of working parents are concerned that this “new normal” will have a long-lasting effect on their career and quality of life. That certainly was the case for Drisana Rios, who was working for an insurance company in San Diego until last month, when she said she was fired for going to HR about her boss’ discrimination against her as a mother working from home.

In June, Rios went viral with her Instagram post about how her boss had complained frequently about her children making noise during online meetings.

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“He wanted me to figure out a way to

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Connecticut preparing for all schools to open, but state planning for online education if COVID-19 surges. Final decision will be made in a month, Gov. Lamont says.

Connecticut is preparing for three different scenarios for the opening of schools and a final decision on how education will look will be made in a month, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

Educators and the state are planning for all learning to take place in schools, but that could be modified to a mix of online and in-class learning or, if there is a coronavirus surge, all education will shift to at-home learning.

“Things change,‘’ Gov. Lamont said at his afternoon COVID-19 briefing, noting that San Diego and Los Angeles decided Monday to shift to an online learning model. “We still have very low metrics compared to San Diego and Los Angeles and most of these other states.”

How schools look “is going to be subject to where we are a month from now,‘’ Lamont said.

Fran Rabinowitz, executive director of the Connecticut Assoociation of Public School Superintendents, said that

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Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Google Search Upgrades Make It Harder for Websites to Win Traffic

(Bloomberg) — Type a query into the Google search bar on a smartphone and there’s a good chance the results will be dominated by advertising.

That stems from a decision in 2015 to test a fourth ad, rather than three, at the top of search results. Some employees opposed the move at the time, saying it could reduce the quality of Google’s responses, according to people familiar with the deliberations. But the company brushed aside those concerns because it was under pressure to meet Wall Street growth expectations, one of the people said.

By 2016, the extra marketing slot was a regular feature. It’s one of the many ways the search leader has altered how it presents results since its early days. Another example is the pre-packaged information Google often displays in a box at the top of a page, rather than sending users to other websites. Phased in gradually

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Urgent deadline approaches for international college students fighting to stay in U.S.

California's three public university systems are fighting federal immigration orders that could force international students at UCLA, above, and other campuses to leave the country. <span class="copyright">(Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times)</span>
California’s three public university systems are fighting federal immigration orders that could force international students at UCLA, above, and other campuses to leave the country. (Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times)

With an urgent deadline approaching Wednesday, the collective force of California’s three public systems of higher education, which educate nearly 3 million students, have joined the legal fight to stop federal immigration authorities from banning international students from the U.S. if they take only online courses this fall.

Two separate lawsuits by the University of California and state Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra with California State University and California Community Colleges have put the nation’s premier public research university and the two largest public higher education systems behind the effort to stop the federal order.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a July 6 directive that requires international students taking only online classes to leave the country and bans visas from being

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Young musicians can perform on virtual stages when schools are closed

<span class="caption">Students at Long Branch Elementary School in Arlington, Virginia, used tech to perform an 'Aristocats' number.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://vimeo.com/423566957" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:William Heim/Arlington Public Schools">William Heim/Arlington Public Schools</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-NC-SA">CC BY-NC-SA</a></span>
Students at Long Branch Elementary School in Arlington, Virginia, used tech to perform an ‘Aristocats’ number. William Heim/Arlington Public Schools, CC BY-NC-SA

Live performances ceased across the U.S. and around the world in early 2020 as governments everywhere barred large gatherings to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

New York City’s Times Square resembled a ghost town by mid-March. The Metropolitan Opera of Los Angeles went dark. Nashville converted its Music City Center into a regional hospital for COVID-19 patients.

But the music didn’t stop.

Everyone from The Roots, the hip-hop ensemble that serves as talk show host Jimmy Fallon’s house band, to the eclectic jazz YouTuber Carlos Eiene filled the void through their innovative use of online media. A wide array of prominent musicians, including Celine Dion, Andrea Bocelli, Lady Gaga, Lang Lang and John Legend, gazed into cameras often set up in their own homes to deliver entertainment

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Dealers on Cockeysville’s Antique Row press on despite decline

Meredith Barney recalls the childhood she spent in her mother’s Cockeysville antique shop fondly.

She remembers roller-skating at Skate Land in the late 1970s, across what was once a two-lane street from Bentley’s Antiques Show Mart, where her mother, Lenis Barney, rented a stall.

After skating, she’d skip across York Road to help her mother with her inventory and say hello to William Bentley, the entrepreneur who brought in fledgling antiques dealers to his multi-dealer shop, and whom Barney affectionately called Uncle Bill.

At 18 years old, Barney followed in her mother’s footsteps and opened her antique business, Meredith’s Quality Home Furnishings, on the same road. Her sister nearby opened Valley Consignments.

“This used to just be known as Antique Row,” Barney said from behind a desk in Hunt Valley Antiques, owned by her mother. Now, “it’s just faded out.”

At its height in the 1980s and 1990s, hundreds of

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CEO Pichai Says Google Will Invest $10 Billion in India

(Bloomberg) — Google said it plans to spend $10 billion over the next five to seven years to help accelerate the adoption of digital technologies in India.

Sundar Pichai, who was born in the country and is now chief executive officer of parent Alphabet Inc., made the announcement at the annual Google for India event via video conference. He said the outbreak of the coronavirus has made clear the importance of technology for conducting business and for connecting with friends and family.

“This is a reflection of our confidence in the future of India and its digital economy,” he said of the India Digitization Fund.

The $10 billion will be invested in partnerships, operations, infrastructure, the digital ecosystem and equity investments. Google said the effort will focus on several key areas:

Enabling affordable access and information for every Indian in their own language, including Hindi, Tamil and PunjabiBuilding new products

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