6 Ways Parents Can Deal With The Anxiety Of Remote Learning … Again

Christel Deskins

When schools around the country abruptly stopped in-person learning last fall, many parents had one endpoint in mind: September. We’d slog through the Zoom classes and meltdowns and clinginess, push through the summer, and by the time fall rolled around, we’d be able to send our children back to school and reclaim some level of normality.

But recently a growing number of major school districts, from Los Angeles to Houston, have announced plans to start the new academic year online. New York City has said children will be in the classroom, at most, three days a week. 

For some parents, the extension of online learning into the fall, as the coronavirus pandemic rages on, is a relief.

For others, it is devastating — and for many, it is a bit of both. 

“It is an impossible situation,” said Annie Snyder, a senior learning scientist at McGraw-Hill. “There is no good

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Inside Cozy Bear, the shadowy Russian hacker group accused of stealing British Covid vaccine

Christel Deskins

 Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.
Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.

To cybersecurity experts well versed in the dark arts of hacking, it will come as no surprise that the blame for an attack on a UK coronavirus vaccine project has been pinned on a Russian group known as Cozy Bear.

With close links to the Kremlin’s foreign and domestic intelligence agencies, Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.

In 2015, it was implicated in an attack on the Pentagon that brought down the Joint Staff email system and its internet, while the following year it was widely blamed for an attack on the servers used by the Democratic National

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How to register to vote

Christel Deskins

Getty Images
Getty Images

With the 2020 US election quickly approaching, now is the time for citizens to ensure their voting information is up-to-date to prevent any hindrance to their right to cast a ballot on election day.

The first step in the process is ensuring you are registered to vote, and that your registration is up to date.

Am I registered to vote?

The first thing you should do is check to see if you’re registered. You can do so by putting your information into Vote.org and checking your registration. Here’s the site: https://www.vote.org/am-i-registered-to-vote/

Voter registration is public record, so the site can determine whether or not you’re registered and at which address you’re registered to vote.

Why does my address matter?

Your address determines your polling place. If you’re planning to vote absentee or to vote by mail, then your address is less important. However, if you plan to vote

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Remote schooling leads to a ‘shocking’ disparity between rich and poor students

Christel Deskins

Low-income students have long faced challenges in completing their homework because they lacked internet access or a computer. And as the pandemic forces many school districts to continue with remote learning — either full- or part-time — in the fall, experts worry those same students risk falling further behind.

The early statistics aren’t encouraging.

At the end of March when lockdowns began in the U.S., the number of students from the lowest earning families who participated in online math classes per week plunged by 62%, while the decrease was less pronounced — down 21% — among students from the highest-earning households, according to a paper by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights group that analyzed data from Zearn, an education nonprofit that partners with schools to provide math programs.

That disparity wasn’t always the case.

“If you look at the past four years of Zearn data, high and low-income kids were participating

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How will the L.A. Phil carry on amid COVID-19? Dudamel and Smith lay out a plan

Christel Deskins

A "What's Next" banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. <span class="copyright">(Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A “What’s Next” banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. (Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)

“What’s Next” looms large in the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s posters for its 2019-20 season. They are still up at Walt Disney Concert Hall, and they can seem more like a question now that the orchestra on Thursday confirmed the inevitable cancellation of concerts for the rest of the year.

Originally, of course, “What’s Next” was meant as an answer to the question of what could possibly follow the L.A. Phil’s unprecedented, epic centennial season, which confirmed its position as the world’s most artistically venturesome and socially committed major orchestra. But the COVID-19 pandemic turned out to be the answer no one planned for, L.A. Phil Chief Executive Chad Smith said in a Zoom interview in which he was joined by Music and Artistic Director Gustavo Dudamel. They talked about plans they want

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Inside the shadowy Russian group behind attempts to steal a Covid vaccine from Britain

Christel Deskins

 Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.
Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.

To cybersecurity experts well versed in the dark arts of hacking, it will come as no surprise that the blame for an attack on a UK coronavirus vaccine project has been pinned on a Russian group known as Cozy Bear.

With close links to the Kremlin’s foreign and domestic intelligence agencies, Cozy Bear, also known as ATP29, is among the world’s most infamous hacker groups, which over the past decade has been linked repeatedly with a string of high-profile attacks.

In 2015, it was implicated in an attack on the Pentagon that brought down the Joint Staff email system and its internet, while the following year it was widely blamed for an attack on the servers used by the Democratic National

Read More

Five Alternative Data Points to Watch in the Covid-19 Economy

Christel Deskins

(Bloomberg Opinion) — During normal times, traditional economic data work fine, offering reliable insight into growth, employment, prices and all sorts of other aspects of the U.S. economy. The drawback is that delays of as long as a month or even a quarter make some of the data of limited use during times like these, when a pandemic has thrown the entire economy off kilter. So there’s a case to be made for the merits of alternative data — everything from new infection rates to apartment rental rates near college campuses — which can offer daily reads of the state of the economy, provided they are used with the appropriate caveats. We recently asked several Bloomberg Opinion writers to cite some of the non-conventional metrics they’re paying attention to during the coronavirus recession.

Mohamed A. El-Erain writes about economics, markets and central banks for Bloomberg Opinion.  He is the chief

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EU court voids data-sharing pact with US over snooping fears

Christel Deskins

The European Court of Justice has ruled an agreement that allows thousands of companies to transfer data to the United States is invalid because its Government can snoop on people’s data.

Its decision to invalidate Privacy Shield will complicate business for some 5,000 companies and it could require regulators to vet any new data transfers to make sure Europeans’ personal information remains protected according to the EU’s stringent standards.

It will no longer simply be assumed that tech companies such as Facebook will adequately protect the privacy of its European users’ data when it sends it to the US.

Rather, the EU and US will likely have to find a new agreement that guarantees Europeans’ data is afforded the same privacy protection in the US as it is in the EU.

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Kimberly Jenkins Wants to Help Decolonize Our Understanding of Fashion

Christel Deskins

The fashion scholar shares her hopes for her new online platform, the Fashion and Race Database.

Kimberly Jenkins
Kimberly Jenkins

Kimberly Jenkins has made waves in the fashion education sphere for shedding necessary light on the role race has historically played in fashion. 

As a part-time lecturer, she taught a popular elective “Fashion and Race” course at Parsons School of Design, where she got her MA in fashion studies. She later expanded on the themes of that course by curating an exhibit of the same name, which the school hosted in 2018. (It’s now available to view on Google Arts and Culture.) At the beginning of this year, Jenkins left Parsons — and New York — to accept a full-time, tenure-track assistant professor of fashion studies position at Ryerson University in Toronto. The new role gave Jenkins the stability and funding to ramp up efforts on a project she’d been working on

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EU court cancels US data-sharing pact over snooping concerns

Christel Deskins

LONDON (AP) — The European Union’s top court ruled Thursday that an agreement that allows thousands of companies — from tech giants to small financial firms — to transfer data to the United States is invalid because the American government can snoop on people’s data.

The ruling to invalidate Privacy Shield will complicate business for some 5,000 companies, and it could require regulators to vet any new data transfers to make sure Europeans’ personal information remains protected according to the EU’s stringent standards.

It will no longer simply be assumed that tech companies like Facebook will adequately protect the privacy of its European users’ data when it sends it to the U.S. Rather, the EU and U.S. will likely have to find a new agreement that guarantees that Europeans’ data is afforded the same privacy protection in the U.S. as it is in the EU.

Privacy activists hailed the court

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