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Police detain prominent law professor and government critic as China’s crackdown continues

Chinese President Xi Jinping <span class="copyright">(Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)</span>
Chinese President Xi Jinping (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)

Tsinghua University law professor Xu Zhangrun, one of China’s few remaining outspoken critics of Chinese President Xi Jinping and the Communist government, was taken from his home in Beijing by police on Monday morning.

Close friends of Xu’s who spoke with his family confirmed that he had been arrested and that they did not know where the police had taken him.

About 20 police officers surrounded Xu’s home Monday morning while more than 10 others entered, searched the residence, confiscated his computer and then took Xu away, according to a statement from friends of Xu, which has been widely circulated among Chinese activists.

Police did not make any public statement about Xu’s arrest or any charges.

The Chinese legal expert had taught jurisprudence and constitutional law at Tsinghua, one of China’s most prestigious universities, but was suspended in 2019 after

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July 15 tax return deadline is right around the corner: What to know

July 15 is the new April 15 for those who still have not filed a tax return. The traditional April income tax deadline was extended this year  for 2019 tax returns, due to the upheaval created by COVID-19.

The one-time extension applied for Michigan returns too, as well as the City of Detroit returns. 

Think everybody who waited owes big money? Think again. Oddly enough, experts say millions of procrastinators are likely owed a federal income tax refund for 2019.

H&R Block estimates that more than half of its clients who still need to file would receive a refund after they file. And the tax giant is running TV ads this summer highlighting the prospects of a tax refund. 

As many as 11.3 million people still had not received federal income tax refunds for 2019 taxes — down 10.8% from a year ago, based on data through June 19 from

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3 Cybersecurity Stocks to Watch

Organizations across the world have been fretting over the issue of cybersecurity for long. The ever-evolving nature of cyberattacks makes it difficult for organizations to keep pace. Cyberattacks are responsible for massive losses and are likely to cost companies almost $5.2 trillion annually, per Absolute Markets Insights data.

Cybercriminals use various ways to attack systems, including ransomware, denial-of-service, SQL injection attack, etc. Notably, ransomware is the most profitable malware, causing maximum financial damages to an individual or organization. It infects a computer to encrypt files or systems. Typically, the victim has to cough up a ransom amount for data retrieval.

Markedly, per Coveware, ransomware is estimated to have caused global damage worth $11.5 billion to organizations in 2019.

We had got an idea about the gravity of damages caused by a ransomware when organizations were affected by two back-to-back ransomware attacks — WannaCry in May and Petya in June 2017.

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The best student discounts we found for 2020

Shopping

Amazon Prime

Student version

Amazon

If you’re not piggy-backing off of your parents’ Amazon Prime account, you can have the subscription for less while you’re in school. College students can get Prime Student for $6.50 per month or $60 per year, and it includes the same perks as a standard Prime membership including free two-day shipping, free same-day delivery in select areas, and access to the entire Prime Video library. Amazon also currently offers a six-month free trial, so you’ll pay even less during your first year.

Buy Prime Student at Amazon – $60/year

Shipt

Shipt is similar to DoorDash but for groceries and household essentials: Pay an annual fee and you can get same-day delivery from numerous stores including Target, Costco and CVS. Shipt’s student plan costs $50 for the year — a 50-percent discount from the normal price — and you get the first two weeks free. Just double

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College students are preparing to return to campus in the fall. Is it worth it?

Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, Gomi Zou signs onto her computer to virtually attend her communications class: a recorded lecture voiced by her professor against the backdrop of a black screen.

“I spend five hours each weekday watching lectures on my computer, which doesn’t include prep and doing assignments for classes,” she said.

Zou, 22, is a senior taking online summer classes at the University of California, Los Angeles, which plans to offer classes in person with the option of remote learning this fall. Along with millions of college students across the United States, she transitioned to online instruction when college campuses closed to curb the spread of the coronavirus back in March.

For students like Zou, taking online classes was a difficult adjustment. Many were devastated to leave campuses prematurely, part ways with friends, and finish the rest of the semester over Zoom calls. Some reported concerns about a

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Coast Guard alters training for incoming class due to virus

NEW LONDON, Conn. (AP) — There will be nobody screaming in the face of 18-year-old Ellie Hiigel when she arrives Wednesday for training in advance of her first year at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and that has her mother a bit disappointed.

The school in Connecticut, like other service academies and military training centers, has made major changes because of the coronavirus pandemic. That means the eight weeks of boot camp for new cadets, known as “Swab Summer” will be much different from when Joanna Hiigel went through it herself in 1991 as a fourth-class swab, or even when Ellie’s sister, Tana, went through it two years ago.

Ellie Hiigel and the 266 other swabs will be arriving not as one large group, but in eight separate platoons spaced out throughout Wednesday. There will be no haircuts, no drilling, no running as a group from place to place, no

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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8 Tips to Make the Most Out of Online Therapy

As coronavirus deaths surge past 100,000 and quarantine continues, our collective mental health is suffering. Millions of Americans are stuck at home, struggling with anxiety, depression, relationship difficulties, loneliness, and the various symptoms of economic reversal. In search of help and unable to go to traditional routes, Americans are flocking to online and app-based therapy solution. Subscriptions for teletherapy apps and services like Talkspace and BetterHelp, which match appropriate mental health professionals with clients via video conference, phone, and text message, have been surging. 

To go without proper mental health counseling is to neglect oneself. Teletherapy is a worthy option in our socially distant times. But the experience of the virtual doctor’s office is different from the physical one. And understanding the various differences between the forms of therapy — and what you can do to make a smooth transition — is essential. 

“It can take some adjustment,” says Dr.

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ETFs to Ride the Wave of 3 Key Coronavirus-Led Trends in 2H20

The year 2020 is seeing some new investment areas that became the hottest trends, thanks to the coronavirus outbreak. These trends are largely the by-products of quarantine measures and efforts to minimize the human-to-human contact, which are absolutely necessary to control the pandemic. Notably, new coronavirus cases hit another record high at 50,023 on Jul 1 with around 23 states halting the reopening process in the United States (per a CNN report). In such a scenario, it seems like these trends are here to stay in the second half of 2020 as the fear of a second wave peaking in the weeks ahead looms large.

Strikingly, even as the rebooting of U.S. economy happens in phases and social-distancing restrictions are being eased, people increasingly opting for contactless operations. It’s largely because the pandemic brought about some changes in lifestyle and influenced Americans’ preferences.

Let’s take a look at the trends

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Think WFH is a challenge? Not compared to WOFH: Working Out From Home

With many gyms closed because of the coronavirus pandemic, WFH is making way for WOFH: Working Out From Home.

“I use a lot of makeshift materials to work out,” says Anne Barreca, of Brooklyn, New York. Without access to a gym or swimming pool, she uses what’s in her environment for exercise, including the stairs leading to her third-floor walkup, groceries, resistance bands, furniture sliders, dish towels — even her 5-month-old son, Benjamin, whom she calls “the world’s cutest kettlebell.” He’s the perfect size for squats and lunges (“comes with the noises too,” her husband, Brian, jokes).

Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)
Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)

“It’s better than nothing,” Barreca said. “Something is always better than just being lazy or sitting around. … There’s no such thing as a perfect workout.”

Exercising using one’s body weight or with what’s available, of course, isn’t a new phenomenon.

In 1976’s “Rocky,” the underdog

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