Their 1960s-Era Dating Strategy? Modern Technology! : NPR

John and Carol Matlock met more than 50 years ago using what was then a fairly new dating technique.

Photo courtesy Carol Matlock


hide caption

toggle caption

Photo courtesy Carol Matlock

John and Carol Matlock met more than 50 years ago using what was then a fairly new dating technique.

Photo courtesy Carol Matlock

Back in the early ’60s, computer dating was a pretty new idea. Only a handful of services existed and they used massive computers — the size of an entire room — to calculate compatibility.

But John Matlock and his future wife, Carol, both decided to take a chance on the new technology.

They filled out questionnaires about themselves and put them in the mail.

Their answers were fed into the computer on a punch card.

Then, they waited for a match.

“You could have paid for just a year or two years. But I paid for

Read More

Time to Appreciate Our Older Teachers Because Adapting to New Technology is Not Easy



a group of people around each other


© Ritu Singh



Technology isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, especially the older generation. We all have seen our parents struggle with gadgets and it’s almost universal that seniors do actually have difficulty mastering their devices. On top of that, the year 2020 further forced them to embrace technology in every aspect of their lives, especially teachers. Even with decades of experience in teaching, online classes turned out to be a whole new ball game. However, despite not being tech-savvy, the elderly teachers and college professors in the country rose up to the challenge and adapted themselves to new technology in order to teach students online amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Learning new tricks every day, these teachers have been putting significant efforts and time for online teaching to make sure the students are productive even at home. Not to forget, many of them have also gone a step ahead, while trying
Read More

IAR Systems supports ultra-low-power Renesas RE MCU Family in industry-leading Arm tools

UPPSALA, Sweden, Sept. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — IAR Systems®, the future-proof supplier of software tools and services for embedded development, announces the update of its leading development toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench® for Arm®. The update includes complete coverage for the ultra-low-power Renesas RE microcontroller (MCU) Family.

The Renesas RE MCU Family is built around an Arm Cortex®-M0+ core and is suitable for IoT devices that require low power consumption, such as wearables and sensing applications for homes, buildings, factories and farms. It is based on Renesas’ proprietary SOTB™ (Silicon-on-Thin-Buried-Oxide) process technology, which is able to reduce power consumption in both the active and standby states, eliminating the need for battery replacement or recharging. 

IAR Embedded Workbench for Arm is a complete C/C++ development toolchain for embedded applications. Developers using IAR Embedded Workbench for Arm are able to leverage advanced code optimization techniques and power debugging functionality to make sure

Read More

Big Picture: Modern’s historic 75-year run carries on

Let’s talk about creative uses for pallets for a minute.

Google the phrase, and you’ll find ideas ranging from coffee tables to planters and patio swings. All very creative. You may even have one at your home.

But none are nearly as creative as the original use for pallets—moving unit loads from one location to another. Today, we take that for granted. But that certainly wasn’t the case in the mid-1940s.

In 1945, the U.S. Navy was still in the early stages of loading palletized cargo on its ships. The new Ford assembly plant in Buffalo was one of the first built around the idea of palletized unit handling. Two years later, unit load handling at the plant accounted for only a third of all incoming materials. That number continued to rise over time.

In between those two milestones in pallets, a new magazine, The Palletizer, was launched in Boston.

Read More

High speed internet now available to North, Central Queens County residents | Provincial | News

Reliable high-speed fibre internet service is now available to more than 1,250 properties in Central and North Queens County.

During the spring and summer, Bell Canada crews and their contractors have worked to install internet cables on poles in areas of North and Central Queens County that haven’t had internet or had substandard internet speeds. Bell Aliant is now ready to connect the service to homes.

“Today is the day we have been waiting to see for a long time,” said Region of Queens Municipality Mayor David Dagley in a press release on Sept. 3. “As of today, 1,273 new premises in North and Central Queens now have access to high-speed internet with another 74 premises expected in the coming weeks for a total of 1,347 premises, which is more than originally planned for in Phase 1.”

Internet speeds of up to 100 Mbps are now available to 411 premises

Read More

How to buy an unlocked phone in 2020, according to a tech expert

Our editors independently selected these items because we think you will enjoy them and might like them at these prices. If you purchase something through our links, we may earn a commission. Pricing and availability are accurate as of publish time. Learn more about Shop TODAY.

Loading...

Load Error

When it’s time to buy a new phone, many people head down to their local Verizon, T-Mobile or AT&T store — or their respective booths at Best Buy — to see what’s on the shelves. This is an easy, straightforward way to buy a phone. But it’s not always the best way. You can also buy phones directly from the manufacturer, from a third-party retailer like Amazon, or through a used or refurbished marketplace.

And doing so comes with a lot of advantages.

You aren’t locked to one mobile carrier

When you buy a phone from your carrier, it’s locked to that

Read More

Away creator on crafting a new type of space story

In Netflix’s Away, Hilary Swank stars as Emma Green, a NASA commander leading the first man-led mission to Mars. But in order to live out her dream, she has to leave her husband and teenage daughter behind for three years. Collectively, the series explores what it means to make history — and what it means to keep a family together.



Hilary Swank, Josh Charles, Talitha Bateman posing for the camera: Andrew Hinderaker reveals the inspiration for the new Netflix series, 'Away.'


© Diyah Pera/Netflix
Andrew Hinderaker reveals the inspiration for the new Netflix series, ‘Away.’

EW spoke with series creator Andrew Hinderaker about the show’s inspiration and what sets it apart.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Let’s start at the beginning. How did this all come together?

ANDREW HINDERAKER: [Executive producer] Jason [Katims] brought me this beautiful Esquire article written by Chris Jones, which was about one of Scott Kelly’s missions on the International Space Station. There were two aspects to it that I really responded to. One, on a grand scale, Chris

Read More

Online Travel Market 2020 – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2023

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 08, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
Online Travel Market Report: By Platform Type (Mobile/Tablets Based, Desktop Based) Mode of Booking (Online Travel Agencies, Direct Travel Facilitators) Service Type (Transportation, Accommodation, Vacation Packages), Region — Global Forecast till 2023

The global online travel market is expected to grow from USD 570.25 billion in 2017 to USD 1,134.55 billion by 2023, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13.16% during the forecast period. The online travel industry has undergone several changes over the last decade, owing to technology advances. Use of technology in the travel industry has come a long way since the global distribution system (GDS) due to the use of mobile applications and rising penetration of the Internet. This has helped in changing the process of travel bookings, making it easy and swift. The service model of

Read More

Broadcast lessons on TV, internet inadequate

Andy Gipson, Guest columnist
Published 5:01 a.m. CT Sept. 3, 2020

CLOSE

As schools debate about returning to online learning, the lack of internet access for many Americans is a big sticking point.

USA TODAY

As the father of four school-age children in rural Mississippi, I would like to propose a common-sense enhancement to COVID-era education. My proposal won’t cost hundreds of millions of dollars; it won’t take decades to implement; and it will provide an immediate workable solution for our teachers, students and parents. 

Put simply, my proposal is to broadcast Mississippi’s best education. We can do it starting tomorrow at virtually no cost to taxpayers. How? Broadcast our best teachers over the public digital television infrastructure already accessible by every Mississippi home.

Andy Gipson is commissioner of the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce. (Photo: Special to Clarion Ledger)

We enjoy living on our farm in rural Mississippi,

Read More

This Was the Tech My Dad Banned in Our House When I Was a Kid

Apple’s logo from 1977 to 1999.

Apple’s logo from 1977 to 1999.
Graphic: Apple (Other)

Where technology was concerned, my dad liked things that were cheap. He liked things that did what they supposed to do. And he didn’t like being hassled. Anything else, and he’d excommunicate an entire company it forever, even if the quality improved down the road. His victims were marked by derisive nicknames: Internet Exploder; Packard-Hell; America Offline. The man was fiercely stuck in his ways, and his frustrating quirks of consumption became the rule of law for our household growing up.

You see, my dad was a hardware engineer. He didn’t talk much about the work he did, which I think involved designing circuit boards and working on EMVs—those chips we all have in our debit and credit cards. But his real passion was computers: specifically, Windows-based computers. Gadgets have since become my passion, as well as the

Read More